Summertime sadness is having your favorite shows taken off the air for an extended period of time. Usually, the summer hiatus lasts around three to four months, give or take. On occasion, the hiatus can last up to nine months if a show is a mid-season replacement (or anything of that ilk). We talk about Game of Thrones , Hannibal, and other high-quality TV that is (or should be) on basic cable. But what about those primetime TV programs?

The Flash

The CW

The CW

Not only is The Flash the best thing DC Comics has done alongside the Nolan’s take on the World’s Greatest Detective, it’s also the best interpretation of a superhero on live-action TV. Bar none. The feeling you get when you see the camera swoop around The Avengers as they face down a new villain? that’s the same feeling that every episode of The Flash delivers. With its unlikely family of characters (blood-related or otherwise, these characters share familial bonds), it’s impossible to watch The Flash without a smile on your face. I dare you.

iZombie

The CW

The CW

I already wrote about iZombie, but I’m going to write about it again. Why? Because it’s worth it. This is a show about a a morgue assistant who has to eat brains to survive (think of the comic Chew), and by doing so is able to relive experiences from the deceased, thereby inheriting their characteristics. On top of that, another Seattle zombie begins organizing a criminal empire consisting solely of other zombies. Please, please, puh-leeze watch this show.

Brooklyn Nine-Nine

FOX

FOX

Parks and Recreation is still the greatest comedy series to ever happen to me. It’s probably the closest we’ll ever get to a live-action The Simpsons program. I’ll always be grateful. But Brooklyn Nine-Nine is a worthy successor. The most diverse comedy on TV, its characters aren’t defined by gender or race. And they’re more than just conduits for jokes. Once they’ve been established, they’re characters who bounce off of each other in believable ways. The situations are worthy of the most sincere of chuckles heightened by the specificity involved in the show’s individual characters finding themselves amid the ensuing hilarity.

Bob’s Burgers

FOX

FOX

Oh my god. I still find The Simpsons to be solid comedy entertainment, still miles ahead of the better episodes of Family Guy. Others don’t feel that way, so they went ahead and crowned Bob’s Burgers as the successor to the Golden Age of The Simpsons. And I initially scoffed at the prospect. Then I finally watched the show, and discovered how consistently funny and heartwarming it really is. The laughs aren’t at the expense of its supported family members, and the relationships are actually healthy. When the parents fight, it’s not because the wife is being a shrew or the man is being a layabout. And the kids are growing up with individual identities all their own. Bob’s Burgers is a refreshing take on family life in an animated setting.

Agent Carter

American Broadcasting Company

American Broadcasting Company

Yes.  Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D vastly improved in its sophomore season. The production value, however, is still not great. But the characters had actual arcs! And there was a consistent sense of escalation in terms of action! The villains were more intriguing, and the political-power struggles held within S.H.I.E.L.D. in the aftermath of The Winter Soldier have become exciting to watch! That being said, only a few spots from this season of S.H.I.E.L.D. could match the quality of the television debut of Agent Carter. I’ve spoken on how Peggy Carter is the best romantic interest in the MCU, because she’s a character first, and a romantic interest second. I think all Marvel leading ladies are relatively well defined on their own, but it’s Peggy Carter who can hold her own series. Harking back to the espionage aspects of Captain America: The First Avenger, Agent Carter opens with Peggy settling into life in New York with a mysterious organization putting Howard Stark on the run, and leaving Peggy to pick up the pieces. Along with some comic book villains, Peggy battles sexism in a post-war, government agency. In the eyes of her male cohorts, she’s ignored, brushed aside, and only useful for grabbing coffee. But you and I both know that Peggy is more than that, and Agent Carter lets us know it on a weekly basis.