Search Results for: hitchcock

AE Writer Watches Hitchcock Films for the First Time in 2017; What Happens Next Will Surprise You!

For many years, the only image that I’d associate with the name “Alfred Hitchcock” was that of a woman (Janet Leigh) screaming in a shower as she was being murdered. I didn’t even know the name of the film. It’s just the mental image I’d return to everytime Hitchcock was brought up in conversation. Over the years, I learned the name of the film (it was Psycho, by the way), as well as the legacy of its acclaimed director, the aforementioned Alfred Hitchcock. I learned that he was one of Hollywood’s most influential directors, that he was hailed as...

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Hello Stranger: Love and Murder in Hitchcock’s Strangers on a Train

In Dial M for Murder, a man attempts to strangle a woman with a scarf, which is replaced with her scarf. In Psycho, the most famous murder takes place while a woman is showering. In Rope, the very sexuality of the protagonists ties into the act of killing. Alfred Hitchcock is no stranger to sex and its connection to acts of violence. These visceral, base instincts are undercurrents throughout the Master’s oeuvre, and are powerfully at play in one of his best, Strangers on a Train. The weakest and strongest parts of the film are in acting. Farley Granger...

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Hitchcock Flashback: Vertigo

Originally published on August 13, 2015. Overview:  A former detective struggling with vertigo and acrophobia  is hired to shadow the wife of an acquaintance. Paramount Pictures/Universal; 1958; Rated PG; 129 Minutes. A Balanced Perspective:  Every ten years, British Film Institute’s Sight & Sound magazine polls hundreds of critics to rank the Greatest Films of All Time. In 2012, Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo earned the top honor, dethroning Citizen Kane from the spot for the first time in fifty years.  The response from the film community was mixed, a predictable reaction given that that Vertigo was a film that was released...

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Foreshadowing Greatness: Alfred Hitchcock and The White Shadow

From early in his 56-year career in film, Alfred Hitchcock was a director. He made his feature debut in 1925 with The Pleasure Garden, and he will always be remembered as one of the seminal figures around which the auteur theory was centered. But even the man who had the Cahiers du Cinéma crowd genuflecting didn’t start at the top. Hitch began his film career in 1920 as a title designer and picked up the other skills that would serve him well over his long and fruitful run during his first five years in the business. While most of...

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5 Less Discussed Hitchcock Films That Need to Be Discussed

Originally published August 13, 2016. If there’s a shorthand term in film journalism and conversation more useful than “Hitchcockian” I am yet to hear it. While terms like “Lynchian” are often misused, “Hitchcockian” is usually appropriate as a point of comparison because, well, whatever is being described, he probably did do it first. As far as I’m concerned there is no single director more influential to cinema, whose intellectual engagement with how an audience thinks and feels was more beneficial to the medium. Because of this, films like Psycho, Rear Window, The Birds and Vertigo have become essential viewing for the aspiring film buff, and rightly so. But Hitchcock didn’t...

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