Author: Anton Reyes

Weekly Roundup: Jeff Goldblum Finds a Way

Box Office Results Neill Blomkamp’s Chappie takes the top spot this weekend, with $13,300,000. The film was a critical and financial disappointment, being Blomkamp’s worst opening weekend to date. Focus drops down 46% to the #2 spot, bringing in $10,020,000. It’s not one of those big Will Smith hits, but it’s slowly making back its money. The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel opened at third best this weekend, bringing in $8,600,000, which is quite impressive for a film that only opened in 1,573 theaters. Kingsman: The Secret Service moves to the #4 spot, taking in $8,300,000, while The Spongebob Movie: Sponge...

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Unfinished Business

Overview: A small business owner and his two employees travel to Europe to close an important business deal. 2015; 20th Century Fox; R; 91 minutes Unfunny People: Fans of Vince Vaughn and his work will be content with his performance here, as he approaches this role like most of his others. Tom Wilkinson and Dave Franco have supporting roles as such comedy stereotypes as the “you only live once” old man and the dumb teenager. Most of the comedy attached to these actors is lazy and idiotic, but some of the jokes hit because of the inherent hilarity of the...

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WEEKLY ROUNDUP: Unite the Seven News Stories

Box Office Results Dropping harder than Christian Grey’s pants, Fifty Shades of Grey brought in $23,246,000, which is a huge drop off from last weekend. Kingsman: The Secret Service held on to the number 2 spot, bringing in $17,525,000. Domestically, Kingsman is Matthew Vaughn’s second highest grossing film, after X-Men: First Class. The SpongeBob Movie: Sponge Out of Water also dropped 50%, earning $15,500,000. The film has crossed the $100 million dollar domestic line, and has already passed its predecessor’s worldwide box office gross. It was a photo finish for this week’s new releases, McFarland USA and The Duff. McFarland USA...

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Armageddon

Overview: NASA and a group of untrained for space drillers as they try to save the world from an enormous meteor hurtling towards them. 1998; Buena Vista Pictures; PG-13; 150 Minutes (Try to be as brief and direct as possible with the overview.) The Characters: Armageddon, one of Michael Bay’s earlier films, offers up a surprisingly star-studded cast. The main focus of the film is oilman-turned-astronaut Harry Stamper played by Bruce Willis, with supporting actors like Ben Affleck, Billy Bob Thorton, Liv Tyler, and William Fichtner. In typical Michael Bay fashion, most of these actors play shallow stereotypes such...

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Mulan

Overview: During an impending Hun invasion in China, a young maiden secretly takes her father’s place in the army. 1998; Buena Vista Pictures; G; 87 minutes Disney’s Heroine: Mulan breaks away from the Disney norm by showcasing a strong female character doing most of the heavy lifting, setting her apart from most Disney princesses. She really isn’t interested in finding true love or chasing her dreams. Heck, the only reason she attends a matchmaker at the start of the movie is to make her family happy by bringing them honor. She’s a compelling and complicated character because of her inner conflicts of honor and identity. Disney breaks down the gender barrier here. Mulan, spurred by love and compassion for others, actually goes out to make a difference, and it’s her intelligence and strength that saves the day. She’s more defined by the things she accomplishes than her desires, and that makes her one of the best characters Disney has ever produced. Family Tradition: Several recognizable Disney staples are seamlessly woven into the film, such as the use of an animal sidekick. In Mulan, Eddie Murphy is a stand out as Mushu. He provides entertaining comic relief, but his character has a surprising story arc of his own that runs parallel to Mulan’s. Disney put extra care in handling supporting characters whom viewers would normally dismiss as stereotypes. They do...

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