Author: Beth McDonough

Hitchcock Flashback: Rear Window

Originally published August 13, 2014. Overview:  A wheelchair bound photographer recovering from a leg injury observes some suspicious behavior while watching his neighbors to pass the time.  1954; Paramount Pictures and Universal Pictures; rated PG; 112 minutes. Peeping Toms:  The plot of Rear Window revolves heavily around the art of observing others, which is a past time that goes hand in hand with human nature and our innate fascination with comparing ourselves to those around us.  The subject of curiosity bordering on voyeurism is one that is just as much if not more relevant in today’s society as it was when...

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New on Netflix Instant Streaming: Bridget Jones’s Baby Is Hilariously Satisfying

Originally Published on September 30, 2016. Bridget Jones’s Baby is now available on Netflix Instant in the United States. Overview: Twelve years after Bridget Jones discovers love with Mark Darcy, we catch up with her only to discover she’s single again. However, one girls’ weekend and one christening celebration are enough to alter the course of her solitude forever, or the next 18 years at least. Universal Pictures; 2016; Rated R; 123 minutes. All By Myself: Fans of the original Bridget Jones’s Diary will be greeted with all of the happy, nostalgic feelings the moment the opening credits roll and we find Bridget...

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A New Wonder Woman Trailer is Here and It’s Stunning

The newest and most gorgeous trailer from the DC Universe is here. The latest trailer for Patty Jenkins’ Wonder Woman just dropped and gives us a much closer look at both the conflict at play and the aesthetic being used by DC this time around. The subtle use of comedy that was introduced in Batman v Superman and applied  heavy handedly in this year’s Suicide Squad appears to fit in much more seamlessly in Wonder Woman, largely due to Chris Pine’s natural charisma and Gal Gadot’s deadpan delivery. The feminine touch of Patty Jenkins can’t hurt either. In this trailer we get a glimpse of where Wonder...

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Book to Box Office: YOU

Book to Box Office: YOU Based On: YOU by Caroline Kepnes Expected Release Date: N/A Director: N/A Summary: When Brown University student Guinevere Beck purchases books from Joe Goldberg at a local shop, it’s a casual encounter to her, but to him it’s even more than a meet cute, it’s destiny. Joe uses her credit card and public social media pages to insert himself into her life, becoming continuously more obsessed the less interested she seems. When others in her life become skeptical over his affection for her, his courtship takes a much more deadly turn. Working for It: To put quite simply, Joe...

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The Girl on the Train is a Lackluster Mystery

Overview: An alcoholic woman who commutes back and forth to the city becomes entangled in the disappearance of a young woman who lives on the same street as her ex-husband and his new family. Based on the 2015 novel of the same name by Paula Hawkins. Universal Pictures; 2016; Rated R; 112 minutes. The Girl Effect: Since the British novel was first published, The Girl on the Train has been compared and contrasted with Gone Girl every step of the way. However, apart from the word “girl” in the title along with the steadily increasing popularity of the concept of the unreliable female narrator,...

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Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children is Delightful Burton

Overview: A young boy journeys to a children’s home to come to terms with the unusual death of his grandfather only to discover that the bedtime stories he was told as a boy we were fictional. Based on the 2011 novel by Ransom Riggs. 2016; 20th Century Fox; Rated PG-13; 127 minutes. Bizarre: Over the years, Tim Burton’s films have often found themselves under fire for lacking in depth and overflowing with outlandish visuals, often bordering on the bizarre. Burton’s signature, quirky style sometimes sacrifices the content for the cover. Sometimes subtlety works with his films, such is the case...

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Amanda Knox is a True Example of Modern Horror

Overview: Almost ten years after the world watched her be convicted and acquitted twice, Amanda Knox and several others involved in the investigation and its surrounding media circus speak out to shed some light on the gruesome murder of a young woman in Perugia, Italy. Netflix; 2016; Not Rated; 92 minutes. You Are Me: I was a self absorbed 20-year-old in 2007 when the trial that had everyone’s eyes glued to their television, except for mine. I know Amanda Knox’s name, of course, but little else about her case was already familiar to me when this documentary was released on Saturday....

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AE Monthly Book Club: October 2016

Happy October, fellow AE book nerds! As you’ve probably gathered, October is our favorite month of the year here at Audiences Everywhere. Halloween is approaching, and the air is turning crisp, which makes it the best month to cozy in with a good (preferably scary) book. For October, we have chosen the novel You by Caroline Kepnes, a story of boy meets girl, boy falls in love with girl at first sight, and boy proceeds to court girl in the most terrifying way. The publisher’s description reads: When a beautiful, aspiring writer strides into the East Village bookstore where Joe Goldberg works,...

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Documentary or Damnation & The Case of: JonBénet Ramsey

This Christmas marks the 20th anniversary of the tragic, enigmatic death of six-year-old pageant starlet JonBénet Ramsey, and what would an unsolved cold case be without renewed publicity and scrutiny? I’ve had an admittedly morbid fascination with this case since shortly after it happened and a number of my parents’ friends began to comment with wonder how much I resembled the young victim with my permed, blonde hair, penchant for frilly dresses, and similar facial features. Now, almost 20 years later, I find myself obsessing over the various anniversary specials that have predictably begun flooding the networks. Everyone is suddenly...

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Book to Box Office: Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

“They were great men with huge flaws, and you know what – those flaws almost made them greater.” Book to Box Office: Harry Potter and the Cursed Child Based On: Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by Jack Throne, John Tiffany, and J. K. Rowling Expected Release Date: Currently a stage production at the Palace Theater in London Director: Jack Thorne Summary: We return to the Wizarding World 19 years after the conclusion of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, where Harry and Ginny’s son Albus is struggling with flourishing under the pressure of his father’s legacy at Hogwarts. His only friend turns out to be Scorpius,...

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5 Female Superheroes Who Don’t Need Capes

With the dominance of DC and Marvel exert over blockbuster season growing as formidable as ever while each powerhouse grows its respective expanded universe, much discussion surrounds the presence and characterization of the select few female superheroes in these franchises. With a Black Widow film in high demand and a Wonder Woman movie in the way, ground is just now being broken on female equality in the comic film universe. However, we have no shortage of female characters in film who have been nothing short of heroes, and they have proven themselves to be ‘super’ all on their own...

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On Demand Movie Guide: August 2016

Summer has cruised by at light speed and August has arrive, with all of its blistering heat and lackluster blockbuster releases. Why leave the house, your couch, and your precious air conditioning to watch a great movie when there are plenty of options on demand? Here are our top picks for this month: Tallulah A Sundance Film Festival darling, Sian Heder both writes and directs this film about a roamer who elicits help in her attempt to raise an abandoned toddler. An examination of motherhood and the definition of a good and bad mother, Tallulah, slipps into many of the...

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Why I Think Ghostbusters Is 2016’s Most Important Film

Paul Feig’s Ghostbusters finally hit theaters, and the reaction has been, well, mixed… to say the least. A wave of criticism of the all female reboot has clouded discussion in the months leading up to the film’s release, allowing a slew of sexist insults targeted at the cast and creators, the most racist and vile of which temporarily chased Leslie Jones off Twitter last week after the movie’s debut. Although Ghostbusters has been faced with an uphill battle for inane reasons, we can’t afford to allow the hate to have a louder voice than the love for the release of a film...

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Why FX’s The Americans Should Win Every Emmy

Although the recent Emmy announcement was largely stuffed to the brim with the nominations we’ve all learned to expect over the recent years with shows like Modern Family, House of Cards, and Veep racking up their usual nods, one FX drama that has been criminally overlooked up until now has suddenly appeared on the radar. The Americans, the Reagan-era drama about two KGB agents living undercover in suburban Washington D.C. which wrapped up its fourth season a month ago, received five Emmy nominations this year, including Outstanding Drama Series, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series (Matthew Rhys), Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama...

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The Devil Wears Prada: A Snapshot of Millennial Psychology 10 Years On

Ten years ago Meryl Streep graced us with her icy tone of disdain and fierce collection of handbags as Miranda Priestly, fashion tycoon and ruthless tyrant of the fashion magazine Runway. 2006 was five Oscar nominations (and one win) ago for Streep, and two nominations (and one win) ago for her costar Anne Hathaway, who played Andy Sachs, the mousy, serious journalist who struggles to maintain her values and her friendships during a cutthroat internship at Runway.  On the surface The Devil Wears Prada watches like a slightly confused combination of criticism and glorification of the high fashion industry, a shallow dip into...

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