Weekly Clickables: James Baldwin & Films About American Immigration Feb06

Weekly Clickables: James Baldwin & Films Abou...

In this week’s Weekly Clickables, we have a review, a few lists, and some fan art. Plenty to soothe your post-Super Bowl blues (or to entertain you in a regular way). First, a review of the new James Baldwin documentary I Am Not Your Negro, which by almost all accounts is life-changing, and which I was supposed to see and review on Friday until they canceled all showings at the theater near me. Not that I’m bitter or upset in any way. This review at least gives a taste of what seeing the film might actually be like, courtesy of The Guardian. Next, the The AV Club provides a list of films capturing the experience of immigrating...

Weekly Clickables: Missy Elliot, Dark Thoughts, &#...

Each week, I gather content for Weekly Clickables based on suggestions from my fellow contributors, friends, and my own leisure browsing. I try to ensure that the items we share are current or, if not current, are somehow relevant to the discourse surrounding film right now. So, this week we have a look at Manhunter, Michael Mann’s adaptation of the novel Red Dragon by Thomas Harris, and we have the trailer for an upcoming Missy Elliot documentary. The rest of what I’m sharing has to do with the experience of refugees and immigrants as told through film or experienced by filmmakers. This is not a time to use entertainment media...

Weekly Clickables: Marching, Bees, & Censorsh...

In this week’s Weekly Clickables, we have a couple items relating to the Women’s March on Washington, but also a look at censorship, the thing with Bee Movie, and an interview with director Danny Strong. Siddhant Adlakha at Birth. Movies. Death. wrote about Indian censorship and his experience interviewing a government official about it. Take a look at images of Women’s March protests from around the world. The New York Times posted a 360 video that lets you get a taste of what it was like to attend the Women’s March in Washington, D.C. If you’re wondering what the deal is with Bee Movie, PBS Idea Channel will...

Weekly Clickables: Cloverfield, Freaks and Geeks, ...

In this week’s Weekly Clickables, we have throwbacks, trailers, and analysis, which is all good stuff, and a nice variety to get your week started. Because I’ve been re-watching Freaks and Geeks, I thought I’d include this essay from a like-minded media consumer, courtesy of Chicago Now. Although Fences has gotten mixed reviews, there are many great examples of film adaptations of stage plays. NewNowNext put together this list a while ago, but it is still relevant. Here’s a video about the connections between Cloverfield and 10 Cloverfield Lane, courtesy of Bloody Disgusting. And a trailer for the upcoming horror...

Weekly Clickables: Taboo, Sci-Fi, & Women In ...

Our Weekly Clickables were a little harder to gather this week than usual, as it was the first week of the year, but we still found a few items worth your time. First, Flavorwire compiled their most anticipated films of 2017. Gwilym Mumford at The Guardian wrote a review of Taboo, the new series starring Tom Hardy, which will give you an idea of what to expect from the show. Nerd Much? updated their list of upcoming sci-fi movies. 2017 promises to be a good year for science fiction. At The Verge, Kaitlyn Tiffany explains her resolution to spend her money on films created by women. And if you want to join Kaitlyn Tiffany in that goal, check...

Weekly Clickables: Remembering Carrie Fisher &...

We made it to 2017! I wisely made no resolutions last year, and so have arrived in the new year having accomplished everything I set out to do. I hope you have, too. But now to what you came for: our Weekly Clickables. This week, we have a remembrance of Carrie Fisher through Leia’s theme, a look at what Netflix got right in the past year, a look at who we lost in 2016 and how they contributed to the discussion of gender, and a bit of Trump totally misunderstanding an important piece of culture. This discussion with Errol Morris about the time Donald Trump completely misunderstood Citizen Kane is fascinating and, of course, terrifying,...

Weekly Clickables: F...

Greetings, and happy almost new year. This week, we have a little of this and a little of that in our Weekly Clickables, some seasonal, and some not. Enjoy! First, an interview with Mandy Moore, choreographer of La La Land, courtesy of The Verge. Next, a look at Katherine Johnson, a West...

Weekly Clickables: A...

This week’s Weekly Clickables are without theme. You’d expect a holiday focus, right? Well, not this year, as you’ve probably seen the best holiday-related lists anyway. In this post, we have a short film, an essay, poll results, ghost stories, and a review, of which you’re likely to enjoy at...

Four of the Best Sco...

In talking about the success of Spielberg’s films, it’s impossible not to mention his career-long partnership with John Williams, who scored all but two of Spielberg’s movies to date. Their collaboration produced such memorable themes as Jaws, Indiana Jones, and Jurassic Park, which most of...

Weekly Clickables: Transformers: Boogie Knights Tr...

In this week’s Weekly Clickables, we have a look at La La Land, new movie posters for old movies, sex scenes, and Transformers meets Boogie Nights. First, The Hollywood Reporter put together a summary of its Women in Entertainment event, which includes some interesting thoughts from successful women in Hollywood and the media. Rolling Stone looked at La La Land and its resurrection of the Hollywood musical. Photographic artist Jordan Bolton has created posters for iconic movies using only select props and sets from those movies. The effect is like an inventory of a movie’s design that reminds you of moments you love and works like a...

Weekly Clickables: Star Trek & Star Wars Hist...

In this week’s Weekly Clickables, we have a couple haunting trailers, a couple items relating to Star Wars and Star Trek history, and a piece about the coming together of two Virginia Tech alumni to make a film about understanding and embracing gender identity. First, a trailer for Hideo Kojima’s new video game Death Stranding, which leaves you needing to play this game if only to understand the premise. Next, a Star Trek IV writer on how Eddie Murphy almost was a part of the film, courtesy of The Hollywood Reporter. An oral history of the 1978 Star Wars Holiday Special, which was a thing. A story about two Virginia Tech alumni reconnecting...

Weekly Clickables: Holidays & Black Mirror

Our Weekly Clickables this week is, naturally, holiday themed. Advertisements and fairy lights are everywhere, so why fight it? First, IndieWire put together a holiday movie preview. Next, check out a compilation of the 20 best shopping scenes, courtesy of Glamour. Now, if you’re in the northern hemisphere, you expect to be cold until May 2017. Thankfully, Nylon helpfully put together a list of the 15 warmest movies. If you grew up in the ’90s and had cable, you’ll appreciate this fascinating oral history of the Double Dare obstacle course, courtesy of The A.V. Club. Finally, NPR correspondent Lakshmi Singh interviewed Gugu...

Weekly Clickables: The Work of Denis Villeneuve &#...

Happy Monday, dear readers, and to those in the US who are celebrating this week, Happy Thanksgiving! This week’s Weekly Clickables include some artwork, some new film creations, and a thoughtful look at the work of Denis Villeneuve. First, Fede Alvarez is working on a Don’t Breathe sequel, as well as directing The Girl in the Spider’s Web, courtesy of Dread Central. Per Screen Rant, Robert Eggers, who directed the 2016 indie horror hit The Witch, is doing a remake of Nosferatu. A group of artists have created posters for sequels that never happened, and they’re all up for sale. Speaking of art, check out the trailer for...

Weekly Clickables: Casting Dumbledore & Writi...

In this installment of Weekly Clickables, we have a couple election-related items, a look at the writer behind Arrival, and speculation on the casting of Dumbledore in the Fantastic Beasts series. First, NPR discussed Arrival short story writer Ted Chiang’s approach to writing, which proved to be inspiring for all current and former technical writers. Screen Rant put together a list of 15 actors who could play a younger Albus Dumbledore. And kudos to them for making an effort to choose gay actors for this role. Daniel Fienberg at The Hollywood Reporter had some interesting thoughts on Kate McKinnon’s performance of “Hallelujah” and Dave...

Weekly Clickables: Baseball at the Movies & T...

In this week’s Weekly Clickables, we have a couple of interesting reviews and a list of great baseball games. There’s something for everyone. Enjoy! First, an interesting review of Japanese Girls Never Die from the Tokyo Film Fest, courtesy of Variety. Also, Quentin Tarantino is being predictably insufferable about his upcoming retirement, but the internet may already be tired of that, per The Guardian. Perhaps, after last week’s World Series, you need more great baseball. As luck would have it, Nerdist put together a list of the 9 best fictional baseball games on film. Finally, if you value silence more than the average person, check out...

Weekly Clickables: Heels & Horror

In this our Weekly Clickables this week, we have mostly horror, but also a review, thoughts on footwear, and some unusual background performances. First, courtesy of the Film4 “Horror Heads” series, an assemblage of Hollywood’s top genre directors – including Tim Burton, Eli Roth, and M. Night Shyamalan – converge to discuss their longstanding and undying love for horror.  In The Atlantic, Megan Garber wrote about women in movies running in heels. Cracked put together this compilation of odd moments from background characters. TV Guide presents a list of the funniest horror movies for those of us who can’t...

Weekly Clickables: Childish Gambino Meets Stranger...

Greetings, readers. I hope you are all ready for another week of Weekly Clickables. We have a few items to share with you from other talented writers and movie fans, which may help you in those dull moments between now and Friday. First, this YouTube channel Ky Edits remixed Childish Gambino’s “Bonfire” with the Stranger Things theme song, and it’s crazy good. Slate explores whether crime shows, a genre that often relies on tradition, really needs to be updated. Newsweek has kindly shared some of the insane stories behind the many, many times Donald Trump has appeared on TV and in movies. Apparently, he’s easy...

Weekly Clickables: Elfman Scores Trump & Horr...

Another week, another collection of Weekly Clickables, featuring content from minds across the Internet. This time, we have an essay and a video relevant to the election – one is serious and one is light, so they balance each other – as well as a couple lists. First, at Vox, Alissa Wilkinson dove deep into one of the more challenging films to discuss in recent years, Nate Parker’s The Birth of a Nation. Next, Danny Elfman composed a horror movie score for Funny or Die to accompany a clip of Donald Trump stalking Hillary Clinton on the debate stage last week, and it’s the best thing we’ve seen or heard in a while. Vanity...

Weekly Clickables: Power Rangers First Look &...

In our regular installment of Weekly Clickables, we have a couple of throwbacks to the 90s, a contest, and a list pertinent to the election season. First, here is an interview with VIFF award winner and creator of The X-Files, Chris Carter, courtesy of Daily Hive. Next, if you have not already, check out the teaser trailer for the upcoming Power Rangers movie. Here’s a contest to win a seriously amazing werewolf replica statue from The Howling, courtesy of ComingSoon.net. In 2012, TIME helpfully put together a list of the 10 best debate scenes, which you might feel like revisiting now. Finally, check out the first official trailer for...

Weekly Clickables: The Topicality of Luke Cage �...

Our Weekly Clickables this week are heavy on movie trailers and cultural relevance. Without further explanation, let’s dive right in.  First, an article from the Huffington Post discussing why Luke Cage is exactly what we need right now. Next, a brilliant article from New York magazine on the 1999 film Election and how watching it again in 2016 creates an experience more akin to a horror film that the creators quite possibly intended to invoke originally. This holiday season, Denzel Washington and Viola Davis star in a film adaptation of August Wilson’s play Fences. Check out the teaser trailer here. Speaking of trailers, The Wrap has put...

Weekly Clickables: The Lovers and the Despot and a...

This week, we have a couple of reviews and something I’m more excited about than is probably normal: a list of period dramas arranged chronologically by the time in which they’re set, with linked reviews for each. First, The Guardian review of The Lovers and the Despot, whose story (if you check the Clickables religiously, as I’m sure you do), you will remember from an NPR interview we shared a few months back. Earlier in the week while browsing for three characters that describe me (you know you at least thought about it, even if you did not participate), I stumbled across The Silver Petticoat Review, which in addition to having a handy...

Weekly Clickables: A Discussion on Marvel Movie Sc...

In our regular installment of Weekly Clickables, we explore the world of music with some discussion of film score composition, and a look at the new Radiohead music video for “Present Tense” directed by Paul Thomas Anderson. Also, for good measure, and to continue warming up for the horror movie season, a list! First, Every Frame A Painting discusses the forgettable scores of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, and how they are symptomatic of the problem with modern day blockbuster compositions. And in a second supplementary video, further examples of lackluster blockbuster scores are given. Uploaded by Australian film and music researcher Dan...

Weekly Clickables: Thoughts On Auteurs and Some Ba...

Another week, another collection of movie-related finds in our Weekly Clickables. Enjoy an interview or two, a discussion of the separation of film from the politics of the auteur, and a dip into horror, as Halloween is just around the corner, after all. First, though, here’s a clip of Kevin Smith recounting how his daughter helped him find joy in film-making again, via Yahoo! Movies. Next, an interview with Ron Howard about his upcoming Beatles documentary, Eight Days A Week, via Fast Company. Bob Chipman examines whether we should (or can) separate film from the politics of its creator in his new video “The Artist and the...

Weekly Clickables: The Evolution of Stop Motion, T...

We have a nice assortment of film-related tidbits for you this week, including a reflection on the summer movie season, a lesson in politics from The Truman Show, and of course some Gene Wilder. First, Matt Singer over at Screen Crush reflects on 2016’s summer movie season. Enjoy his use of statistics to back up his feelings about the season’s movie options. Nerdwriter shows us what The Truman Show can teach us about politics. Matt Grosinger at The Nerdist wrote about his experience sitting in on Andrew Bird’s Live from the Great Room, in which Bird and a guest (this time Matt Berninger) jam in the great room of Bird’s house.  Following...

Lo and Behold: Reveries Of The Connected World Examines the Internet Aug31

Lo and Behold: Reveries Of The Connected World Exa...

Overview: A documentary presenting the past, present, and future of the Internet and information technology and its impact–real and potential–on our species. Magnolia Pictures; 2016; Rated PG-13; 98 minutes. Would We Expect Anything Less?: Once again, Werner Herzog weaves different but related threads of the human experience into an educational, thought-provoking, and awesome documentary that simultaneously entertains and informs. He begins at the beginning–the very first message sent from host to host: “Lo.” From there, he explores all that the Internet has to offer–from an awe-inspiring source of information and a tool for improving lives...