Author: Katherine B. Shelor

Tiny Human Movie Review: Frozen

Recently, my daughter (4) has become interested in (read: obsessed with) Frozen. Every day, she wants to watch Frozen. If she’s not watching it, she wants the music on. If the music isn’t on, she wants to act out the movie. She expresses herself in lines from the script (“please don’t shut me out” after I snap at her for dawdling, for example). In an effort to channel her enthusiasm for this one movie into films in general, I interviewed her to find out why she liked it, and since then have been using the same series of questions...

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Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story Tells An Unexpected Story

Overview: A documentary on the life and accomplishments of actor and inventor Hedy Lamarr. Zeitgeist Films; 2017; Not Rated; 90 minutes. The Basics: From a series of interviews with Hedy Lamarr’s children, friends, and interspersed clips of an extended interview with Hedy herself, we learn the unusual story of a beautiful and intelligent woman who, though she had an active and inventive mind, found her intelligence valued far less than her beauty. Lamarr was born in Austria-Hungary and first gained recognition for the controversial film Ecstasy (1933), in which she briefly appeared nude. The same year, she married her...

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Is It Still Fun?: Casper (1995)

It’s the spring of 1995. I am almost 10 years old, and I love my cat, stories about cats, Anne of Green Gables, and Casper. These things have held up over the years—I still love my cat (may he rest in peace), I still love stories about cats (see the “Cat Who” mysteries), and Anne of Green Gables is inarguably one of the better things to come out of Canada. But what about Casper? Does what I loved about it back then still make it enjoyable now? What I loved then: As a pre-teen, I identified with Kat (Christina...

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Battlestar Galactica (2003) Cast Reunion at EW

As part of Entertainment Weekly‘s EW Reunites series, members of the Battlestar Galactica cast (Edward James Olmos, Mary McDonnell, Katee Sackhoff, Tricia Helfer, Grace Park, James Callis and Michael Trucco) along with writer/producer Ronald Moore got back together and talked about their time on the show (sadly, Jamie Bamber didn’t participate). Ron Moore begins by talking about how he first got involved, and the timeliness of the reboot following the September 11th attacks. Can read the full interview here.   Featured Image:...

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The Handmaid’s Tale: Night

The final episode of the season begins with a flashback to the Handmaids’ introduction to the Red Center, where they are called sluts for their clothing. “Humble yourself in the sight of the Lord and he shall lift you up”–they are taught to be demure and submissive. At the end of the opening scene, Aunt Lydia takes June to a room with a single chair, where a tag is put on her ear, and she reflects on how the handmaids looked at each other then–with terror–and that they don’t look at each other that way anymore. “They should never...

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The Handmaid’s Tale: Jezebels

In this episode, we learn a bit more about Nick and sense the awakening of his moral compass through his compassion for June. As the episode opens, June is sitting on Nick’s bed, feeling guilty because Luke is alive but she goes back to Nick frequently—because it feels good. We then flash back to Before, and see Nick at a career counseling place. He apparently has a hard time holding down a job, and when he’s heckled in line he punches the man who heckled him. Rather than chasing him off and telling him not to come back, the...

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The Handmaid’s Tale: Where the Boys Are

In the previous episode, June learned that Luke was still alive—the episode ended with a visiting Mexican diplomat pressing a notebook into her hand so that she could write her husband a note. It follows, then, that this episode focuses entirely on Luke’s story. We learn that he was, indeed, shot when they were trying to flee to Canada, but that he survived and later escaped from a crashed ambulance. We also learn how the family came to be traveling on that remote road. They had previously escaped from the city and were living in a cabin owned by...

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The Handmaid’s Tale: A Woman’s Place

In this installment, Gilead prepares for a visit from the Mexican ambassador. The handmaids are tasked with scrubbing bloodstains off of the walls where dead bodies are usually hung as examples of what will happen to those who misbehave, and Jeanine comments on how it looks strange without the bodies—people can get used to anything. At the Waterfords’ house, tension is high because the Ambassador will be coming over for dinner, and life in Gilead must be shown in the best light. Mrs. Waterford warns Offred to speak wisely to the visiting diplomats. For the first time in the...

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‘The Handmaid’s Tale’: Weekly Recap – Episode 5, Faithful

Episode 5: Faithful In this week’s episode, some time has passed. Offred has, at this point, played 34 games of Scrabble with the Commander, and is feeling comfortable enough with him to share something approaching real opinions. He gives her a gift—a fashion magazine a la Cosmopolitan—and although she says it is not allowed, he says, “It is with me.” Offred—hereafter referred to as “June” in flashbacks for the purposes of these summaries—recalls when she first met Luke. She and Moira are waiting at a hot dog stand, looking through Tinder, and lamenting the string of bad dates June...

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‘The Handmaid’s Tale’: Weekly Recap – Episode 4

Episode 4: “Nolite Te Bastardes Carborundorum” In this episode, the character of Commander Waterford is developed further, and we gain insight into his behavior toward Offred. A lot happens in 50 minutes, so bear with me. At the start of the episode, Offred is still locked in her room (having failed to become pregnant the previous episode) and the Commander learns that an Aunt (leader/instructor of the Handmaids) escaped from a Red Center and made it across the border to Canada, where she gave an interview to the Toronto Star. The Commander calls her tales hyperbole, yet it’s clear...

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The Handmaid’s Tale: Weekly Recap

This week, the first three episodes of The Handmaid’s Tale were released for US audiences on Hulu. The remaining seven episodes will be released weekly on Wednesdays. This Hulu original adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s 1985 novel is directed by Reed Morano with a screenplay written by Bruce Miller, and stars Elisabeth Moss, Joseph Fiennes, Alexis Bledel, and Samira Wiley, among others. I’ll be providing synopses each week, with some commentary. Note that I won’t be drawing any comparisons to the novel, as I haven’t read it (though, just to defend my credibility, I must add that I’ve read several...

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How Will the New Oscar Rules Affect Nominees for Best Animated Feature?

This past Friday, the Academy announced some changes to its rules for Oscars eligibility and participation. In particular, multi-part documentaries are now not eligible for consideration, and the requirements for participation in the committee that determines the Best Animated Feature nominees have been relaxed such that its members will no longer be mostly people with experience (past or present) in the field of animation. Since the new rules were published, there has been speculation about their effects on the awards. Josh Spiegel at /Film and Scott Feinberg at the Hollywood Reporter agree on the potential effects to the Best...

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The Inimitable Singin’ in the Rain: 65 Years Later

Nine years ago, I was in my last semester of college and had just started dating the guy who would eventually become my husband. We were at that stage in our relationship where any moment not spent together was a moment wasted, and so we often attended each other’s large lecture classes in order to hold hands under the desk and write notes to each other in the margins of our notebooks. And learn, too, of course. He sat with me in my Greek and Roman Mythology fluff course, and I sat with him in his film class. And...

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Weekly Clickables: IT, Global Warming, and Bollywood

In our Weekly Clickables this week, we have no theme–just a collection of interesting content from fellow movie-lovers. First, The Guardian shared the trailer for An Inconvenient Sequel, which, you will not be shocked to learn, is the sequel to Al Gore’s 2006 documentary An Inconvenient Truth. Next, I discovered that there is an entire site devoted to writing about and reporting on silent film, and in their news section they highlight some really interesting features about early film, as well as an upcoming Blu-Ray collection of early movies by female filmmakers. Be sure to check out Movies Silently for yourself. NPR interviewed Emil...

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Weekly Clickables: Beauty and the Beast & Female-Centric Cinema

In our Weekly Clickables this week, we have meltdowns, a look at the upcoming Hulu series The Handmaid’s Tale, and a focus on women in lead roles. NPR posted some highlights from an interview with Christina Ricci about her role as Zelda Fitzgerald in Z: The Beginning of Everything. The Independent discusses the relevance of Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, which has been adapted into an original series now on Hulu. There have been plenty of “meh” reviews of Beauty and the Beast, so here’s a more positive review from The Muse that takes into account the effect of nostalgia on our experience...

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