Author: Katherine B. Shelor

Four of the Best Scores to Spielberg Movies (That Are Not Jaws, Jurassic Park, or Indiana Jones)

In talking about the success of Spielberg’s films, it’s impossible not to mention his career-long partnership with John Williams, who scored all but two of Spielberg’s movies to date. Their collaboration produced such memorable themes as Jaws, Indiana Jones, and Jurassic Park, which most of us can call to mind on command. However, there are other, equally memorable scores that, for whatever reason, haven’t made the same imprint on the collective unconscious. Perhaps it’s because the films were less successful than blockbusters like Indiana Jones, or less thrilling than Jurassic Park. It’s impossible to say, but lest you miss...

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Weekly Clickables: Transformers: Boogie Knights Trailer & More

In this week’s Weekly Clickables, we have a look at La La Land, new movie posters for old movies, sex scenes, and Transformers meets Boogie Nights. First, The Hollywood Reporter put together a summary of its Women in Entertainment event, which includes some interesting thoughts from successful women in Hollywood and the media. Rolling Stone looked at La La Land and its resurrection of the Hollywood musical. Photographic artist Jordan Bolton has created posters for iconic movies using only select props and sets from those movies. The effect is like an inventory of a movie’s design that reminds you of...

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Weekly Clickables: Star Trek & Star Wars History

In this week’s Weekly Clickables, we have a couple haunting trailers, a couple items relating to Star Wars and Star Trek history, and a piece about the coming together of two Virginia Tech alumni to make a film about understanding and embracing gender identity. First, a trailer for Hideo Kojima’s new video game Death Stranding, which leaves you needing to play this game if only to understand the premise. Next, a Star Trek IV writer on how Eddie Murphy almost was a part of the film, courtesy of The Hollywood Reporter. An oral history of the 1978 Star Wars...

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Weekly Clickables: Holidays & Black Mirror

Our Weekly Clickables this week is, naturally, holiday themed. Advertisements and fairy lights are everywhere, so why fight it? First, IndieWire put together a holiday movie preview. Next, check out a compilation of the 20 best shopping scenes, courtesy of Glamour. Now, if you’re in the northern hemisphere, you expect to be cold until May 2017. Thankfully, Nylon helpfully put together a list of the 15 warmest movies. If you grew up in the ’90s and had cable, you’ll appreciate this fascinating oral history of the Double Dare obstacle course, courtesy of The A.V. Club. Finally, NPR correspondent Lakshmi Singh interviewed Gugu Mbatha-Raw,...

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Weekly Clickables: The Work of Denis Villeneuve & A Nosferatu Remake

Happy Monday, dear readers, and to those in the US who are celebrating this week, Happy Thanksgiving! This week’s Weekly Clickables include some artwork, some new film creations, and a thoughtful look at the work of Denis Villeneuve. First, Fede Alvarez is working on a Don’t Breathe sequel, as well as directing The Girl in the Spider’s Web, courtesy of Dread Central. Per Screen Rant, Robert Eggers, who directed the 2016 indie horror hit The Witch, is doing a remake of Nosferatu. A group of artists have created posters for sequels that never happened, and they’re all up for sale....

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Weekly Clickables: Casting Dumbledore & Writing Arrival

In this installment of Weekly Clickables, we have a couple election-related items, a look at the writer behind Arrival, and speculation on the casting of Dumbledore in the Fantastic Beasts series. First, NPR discussed Arrival short story writer Ted Chiang’s approach to writing, which proved to be inspiring for all current and former technical writers. Screen Rant put together a list of 15 actors who could play a younger Albus Dumbledore. And kudos to them for making an effort to choose gay actors for this role. Daniel Fienberg at The Hollywood Reporter had some interesting thoughts on Kate McKinnon’s performance of “Hallelujah”...

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Weekly Clickables: Baseball at the Movies & The Importance of Silence

In this week’s Weekly Clickables, we have a couple of interesting reviews and a list of great baseball games. There’s something for everyone. Enjoy! First, an interesting review of Japanese Girls Never Die from the Tokyo Film Fest, courtesy of Variety. Also, Quentin Tarantino is being predictably insufferable about his upcoming retirement, but the internet may already be tired of that, per The Guardian. Perhaps, after last week’s World Series, you need more great baseball. As luck would have it, Nerdist put together a list of the 9 best fictional baseball games on film. Finally, if you value silence more than...

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Weekly Clickables: Heels & Horror

In this our Weekly Clickables this week, we have mostly horror, but also a review, thoughts on footwear, and some unusual background performances. First, courtesy of the Film4 “Horror Heads” series, an assemblage of Hollywood’s top genre directors – including Tim Burton, Eli Roth, and M. Night Shyamalan – converge to discuss their longstanding and undying love for horror.  In The Atlantic, Megan Garber wrote about women in movies running in heels. Cracked put together this compilation of odd moments from background characters. TV Guide presents a list of the funniest horror movies for those of us who can’t handle the...

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Weekly Clickables: Childish Gambino Meets Stranger Things & More

Greetings, readers. I hope you are all ready for another week of Weekly Clickables. We have a few items to share with you from other talented writers and movie fans, which may help you in those dull moments between now and Friday. First, this YouTube channel Ky Edits remixed Childish Gambino’s “Bonfire” with the Stranger Things theme song, and it’s crazy good. Slate explores whether crime shows, a genre that often relies on tradition, really needs to be updated. Newsweek has kindly shared some of the insane stories behind the many, many times Donald Trump has appeared on TV...

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Weekly Clickables: Elfman Scores Trump & Horror Movies for Any Mood

Another week, another collection of Weekly Clickables, featuring content from minds across the Internet. This time, we have an essay and a video relevant to the election – one is serious and one is light, so they balance each other – as well as a couple lists. First, at Vox, Alissa Wilkinson dove deep into one of the more challenging films to discuss in recent years, Nate Parker’s The Birth of a Nation. Next, Danny Elfman composed a horror movie score for Funny or Die to accompany a clip of Donald Trump stalking Hillary Clinton on the debate stage last week,...

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Weekly Clickables: Power Rangers First Look & The Best Movie Debates

In our regular installment of Weekly Clickables, we have a couple of throwbacks to the 90s, a contest, and a list pertinent to the election season. First, here is an interview with VIFF award winner and creator of The X-Files, Chris Carter, courtesy of Daily Hive. Next, if you have not already, check out the teaser trailer for the upcoming Power Rangers movie. Here’s a contest to win a seriously amazing werewolf replica statue from The Howling, courtesy of ComingSoon.net. In 2012, TIME helpfully put together a list of the 10 best debate scenes, which you might feel like revisiting now. Finally,...

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Weekly Clickables: The Topicality of Luke Cage & Election

Our Weekly Clickables this week are heavy on movie trailers and cultural relevance. Without further explanation, let’s dive right in.  First, an article from the Huffington Post discussing why Luke Cage is exactly what we need right now. Next, a brilliant article from New York magazine on the 1999 film Election and how watching it again in 2016 creates an experience more akin to a horror film that the creators quite possibly intended to invoke originally. This holiday season, Denzel Washington and Viola Davis star in a film adaptation of August Wilson’s play Fences. Check out the teaser trailer here. Speaking of trailers, The Wrap has...

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Weekly Clickables: The Lovers and the Despot and a List of Period Dramas

This week, we have a couple of reviews and something I’m more excited about than is probably normal: a list of period dramas arranged chronologically by the time in which they’re set, with linked reviews for each. First, The Guardian review of The Lovers and the Despot, whose story (if you check the Clickables religiously, as I’m sure you do), you will remember from an NPR interview we shared a few months back. Earlier in the week while browsing for three characters that describe me (you know you at least thought about it, even if you did not participate),...

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Weekly Clickables: A Discussion on Marvel Movie Scores & Horror Ephemera

In our regular installment of Weekly Clickables, we explore the world of music with some discussion of film score composition, and a look at the new Radiohead music video for “Present Tense” directed by Paul Thomas Anderson. Also, for good measure, and to continue warming up for the horror movie season, a list! First, Every Frame A Painting discusses the forgettable scores of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, and how they are symptomatic of the problem with modern day blockbuster compositions. And in a second supplementary video, further examples of lackluster blockbuster scores are given. Uploaded by Australian film and music...

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Weekly Clickables: Thoughts On Auteurs and Some Back to School Horror

Another week, another collection of movie-related finds in our Weekly Clickables. Enjoy an interview or two, a discussion of the separation of film from the politics of the auteur, and a dip into horror, as Halloween is just around the corner, after all. First, though, here’s a clip of Kevin Smith recounting how his daughter helped him find joy in film-making again, via Yahoo! Movies. Next, an interview with Ron Howard about his upcoming Beatles documentary, Eight Days A Week, via Fast Company. Bob Chipman examines whether we should (or can) separate film from the politics of its creator in...

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