Author: Katherine B. Shelor

Weekly Clickables: Thoughts On Auteurs and Some Back to School Horror

Another week, another collection of movie-related finds in our Weekly Clickables. Enjoy an interview or two, a discussion of the separation of film from the politics of the auteur, and a dip into horror, as Halloween is just around the corner, after all. First, though, here’s a clip of Kevin Smith recounting how his daughter helped him find joy in film-making again, via Yahoo! Movies. Next, an interview with Ron Howard about his upcoming Beatles documentary, Eight Days A Week, via Fast Company. Bob Chipman examines whether we should (or can) separate film from the politics of its creator in...

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Weekly Clickables: The Evolution of Stop Motion, The Truman Show & Politics

We have a nice assortment of film-related tidbits for you this week, including a reflection on the summer movie season, a lesson in politics from The Truman Show, and of course some Gene Wilder. First, Matt Singer over at Screen Crush reflects on 2016’s summer movie season. Enjoy his use of statistics to back up his feelings about the season’s movie options. Nerdwriter shows us what The Truman Show can teach us about politics. Matt Grosinger at The Nerdist wrote about his experience sitting in on Andrew Bird’s Live from the Great Room, in which Bird and a guest...

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Lo and Behold: Reveries Of The Connected World Examines the Internet

Overview: A documentary presenting the past, present, and future of the Internet and information technology and its impact–real and potential–on our species. Magnolia Pictures; 2016; Rated PG-13; 98 minutes. Would We Expect Anything Less?: Once again, Werner Herzog weaves different but related threads of the human experience into an educational, thought-provoking, and awesome documentary that simultaneously entertains and informs. He begins at the beginning–the very first message sent from host to host: “Lo.” From there, he explores all that the Internet has to offer–from an awe-inspiring source of information and a tool for improving lives worldwide, to the crutch...

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Weekly Clickables: The Best 100 Films of the 21st Century & More

Another Monday, another collection of Weekly Clickables featuring a fine selection of film-related odds and ends. First, a list of the best 100 films of the 21st century, according to a BBC Culture survey of film critics and curators world-wide. Next, a short video showing a few romantic comedies, remade with feminism in mind, courtesy of The Huffington Post. Io9 shared a video exploring some of the world from Kubo and the Two Strings. At NPR, a Q&A on how the new Ben-Hur compares to its predecessors. Finally, five things to know about the upcoming James Baldwin documentary, courtesy of...

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Review: Iron Jawed Angels

Overview: Alice Paul (Hilary Swank) and Lucy Burns (Frances O’Connor) start the National Woman’s Party (NWP) after a falling out with the National American Woman’s Suffrage Association (NAWSA) over their approach to lobbying for a constitutional amendment guaranteeing female citizens the right to vote. HBO; 2004; 125 minutes. “Simply, women were not viewed as an integral part of the historical record.” – Judith P. Zinsser: It’s incumbent upon the citizens of any free nation to understand and perpetuate the stories of those people that made them free, and so we, in the United States, see film after film about...

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Weekly Clickables: Olympic Films & Another Ruined Childhood

In our latest Weekly Clickables installment, we have a few lists, a short interview with Sian Davies, and a discussion of Darren Aronofsky’s Noah. First, at Short Film Stuff, an interview with Sian Davies, who, among other things, directed a few episodes of the delightful Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries. If you want a non-partisan and scientific approach to the “which superhero is the best” argument, check out the best superhero according to science, courtesy of Cinema Blend. The Olympics are full of film-worthy stories, so here is a list of the top ten Olympic-themed movies of all time (up until the present, that...

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Weekly Clickables: Who Should Play Lando & Herzog Talks Kanye West

Greetings, dear readers. In our regular installment of Weekly Clickables, we have a look at animated films for adults (and kids), some suggestions for who should play young Lando Calrissian, and other non-Star Wars related items. First, Variety provided a list of the 10 greatest animated films for adults: http://variety.com/gallery/10-greatest-animated-films-adults-sausage-party-anomalisa-persepolis-fantastic-mr-fox/ /Film put together this list of actors who should play young Lando Calrissian after the rumor broke that Donald Glover might get the job: http://www.slashfilm.com/15-actors-who-should-play-young-lando-calrissian/ For those of you who like words, Merriam-Webster took at look at word trends from movies in 2015: http://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/trends-from-movies/revenant If you’re interested in the making of The Little...

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The Art of the Score: Star Trek & Michael Giacchino

It was pouring rain, and we had lawn seats. I had neglected to bring a poncho, an umbrella, or even a towel, so my friend and I sat in the car for a moment before heading into the deluge. The box office was a quarter mile away. “Ready?” she asked. “Let’s do it, “ I said, and opened the door into the rain. Ten minutes later, we arrived dripping at the ticket window, soaked through, rain running in rivulets down our hair and into our eyes, shirts hanging heavy with water. “We’d like to upgrade to covered seats, please,”...

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Weekly Clickables: Stranger Things, Plausibility, and Mr. Robot

Ah, the last days of summer, when children won’t admit that they’re bored but secretly want to be back at school, and adults find themselves buying clothes for the new school year, even though they don’t attend school and haven’t outgrown anything in a decade (except as a result of a lagging metabolism). What better time for distraction. Check out our latest Weekly Clickables below. First, Emma Watson interviews the author of Persepolis on the evolving position of women in Iran: http://www.vogue.com/13462655/emma-watson-interviews-marjane-satrapi/ Or, there’s this BBC article about the real-life hackers helping Mr. Robot seem believable, even to IT security experts:...

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Weekly Clickables: For the Love of Spock & Storytelling Tips

We have a little bit of everything for you with our Weekly Clickables today, including a couple of interviews, some storytelling tips, a defense of an arguably indefensible mother, and a new movie trailer. First, a defense of Mrs. Bates, courtesy of Birth.Movies.Death, that mounts the argument for Norman Bates’s mother’s innocence in the face of cinematic perjury. If you love Spock, you have a trailer in support of For the Love of Spock, a documentary created by Adam Nimoy about his father, whose portrayal of the Star Trek character built a legion of devoted fans. In this interview published by The Guardian, Anna Gunn...

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Weekly Clickables: Film Noir, Running on Screen & The Neon Demon

Happy Monday, folks. We found some great Weekly Clickables to share with you and take your mind off the massive headache of a spreadsheet you have to work on today (or whatever form the mundane takes for you). First, Mark Viera gives his opinion on the best in the film noir genre. Next is an interview with Alexi Pappas, a showrunner (among many other things) who created a series of short films about running. I watched and enjoyed A Young Doctor’s Notebook this weekend (a good fit for Daniel Radcliffe’s acting style), which led us to this look at Harry...

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Weekly Clickables: Thoughts on Sulu & Lessons for Hollywood

In our Weekly Clickables this week, we have some transformations, an inside look at the hermit state of North Korea, and an opinion piece on the lessons a disappointing summer movie season can teach the movie industry. First up, The LA Times gives us a taste of Under The Sun, a documentary about North Korea. Next, Simon Pegg weighs in on the controversy regarding George Takei’s response to the announcement that Star Trek Beyond’s Sulu is gay, wherein both actors have thoughtful reasons behind their supported positions. For something lighter, check out clever make-up transformations into well-known movie characters from Lucia...

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Weekly Clickables: DeLoreans & Zoolander 2’s Fashion Faux Pas

Happy Fourth of July, American readers! For those of you not out grilling or setting off fireworks dangerously close to your neighbor’s house, we have a few Weekly Clickables to help you pass your Monday. With opportunity dwindling with each passing year, there are summer blockbuster hits that aren’t aimed at younger audiences. It’s just a matter of where to find them, courtesy of The Guardian.  If owning a DeLorean is out of reach for your pocketbook, why not an iPhone case that looks just like it? Can you say “take my money?” The Present is a short animated film that reminds us there are...

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Weekly Clickables: Slapstick Humor, Haiku, and Garrison Keillor

Another Monday, another Weekly Clickables post! This week, we have some haikus, some self-reflection, and a look at the host of the long-running radio variety show A Prairie Home Companion. First, The AV Club continue their series Polite Fight with a discussion of the cinematic choices that made Game of Thrones‘ “Battle of the Bastards” so effective. When much of the country tunes in to a week focused on stories about shark habits, shark attacks, and goes to see shark movies, it’s time for some self-examination. Over at Vox, Aja Romana explores why we love shark movies. For those...

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No Stranger Than Love is a Surprising Indie Rom-Com

Overview: Lucy Sherrington finds herself in a pickle when a hole opens up in her living room floor, swallowing the married man to whom she had just declared her love. Orion Pictures; 2016; Rated R; 89 minutes. An Education In Love: If you want a romantic comedy but are tired of the vapid, predictable films that populate the genre, you might enjoy this quirky creation from the mind of writer Steve Adams. Alison Brie (of Community and Mad Men) plays Lucy, an art teacher and small town sweetheart who is so bombarded by declarations of love from the men...

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