Author: Staff

2014 Screen Actors Guild Awards Nominees

This morning at Design Center’s SilverScreen Theater in West Hollywood in Los Angeles, Ansel Elgort (The Fault in Our Stars) and Eva Longoria announced the nominees for this years Screen Actors Guild (or SAG) Awards. A full list of nominees is presented below.  The nominees for the film categories are presented below. Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role Steve Carrell:  Foxcatcher (Sony Pictures Classics) Benedict Cumberatch:  The Imitation Game (The Weinstein Company) Jake Gyllenhaal: Nightcrawler  (Open Road Films) Michael Keating: Birdman (Fox Searchlight Pictures) Eddie Redmayne:  The Theory of Everything (Focus Features) Outstanding Performance by a...

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2014 National Board of Review Awards Annoucements

The National Board of Review has been around supporting and recognizing artistic achievement in film for 104 years.  Their awards ceremony has been held annually since 1930.  Award Winners for 2014 were announced on December 2, 2014. A complete list of winners is provided below. Winners Best Film:  A Most Violent Year Best Director:  Clint Eastwood: American Sniper Best Actor (TIE):  Oscar Isaac: A Most Violent Year; Michael Keaton: Birdman Best Actress: Julianne Moore: Still Alice Best Supporting Actor:  Edward Norton: Birdman Best Supporting Actress:  Jessica Chastain: A Most Violent Year Best Original Screenplay:  Phil Lord & Christopher Miller:...

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The ABCs of Scorsese U – Z

U is for Underrated Films: So, we all know the Raging Bulls (1980) and the Taxi Drivers and the Goodfellas. But as we wind down the alphabet, what are some of Martin Scorsese’s other films that no one talks about nearly as much as they should? Well, my favorite is The King of Comedy, but even more overlooked is After Hours (1985). There’s also Bringing out the Dead (1999), which stars Nicolas Cage as a haggard Manhattan ambulance paramedic plagued by the patients he couldn’t save. Some of Scorsese’s earlier films that are oft forgotten include Boxcar Bertha (1972) and New York, New York (1977), a classic in its own way. So, with a filmography as bountiful and varied as Scorsese’s—a filmography which I’m admittedly still working my way through—it’s easy to lose sight of some really great gems that simply never reached the status of his other films.  V is for Voice-Overs: Voice-overs are often considered a crutch in many films, a ham-fisted way of delivering already apparent information or exposition. But, they are used with purpose in Scorsese’s filmography, adding shades of likeability to unlikeable characters and creating a closer relationship between the character and the audience (this is part of what makes Travis Bickle in Taxi Driver, such a terrifying figure). The voice-overs also contribute largely to an aspect of Scorsese’s films that is often over-looked:...

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The ABCs of Scorsese P – T

P is for Preservation: In 1990, Martin Scorsese established The Film Foundation, along with a coalition of other big name directors including: Steven Spielberg, Woody Allen, Clint Eastwood, Robert Altman, Francis Ford Coppola, George Lucas, Sydney Pollack, Stanley Kubrick, and Robert Redford. The Film Foundation is a non-profit organization that is dedicated to protecting, preserving, and restoring films in order to prevent deterioration. The foundation was started as a reaction to the loss of 50% of films made before 1950, and 90% of films that had been lost before 1929. The Film Foundation also hosts educational courses designed to...

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The ABCs of Scorsese K – O

K is for Keitel: While the number of times he’s worked with Scorsese haven’t reached the likes of Robert DeNiro, and his performances never achieved the same impact on popular culture or the awards circuit as Joe Pesci or Leonardo DiCaprio, Harvey Keitel has been an instrumental figure in Martin Scorsese’s career. Both men allowed for each other to get their start in Hollywood. Since 1967, Keitel has been featured in a total of five Scorsese films. Scorsese’s debut film, Who’s That Knocking at My Door? was also Keitel’s debut as an actor. While his career has typically typecast...

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The ABCs of Scorsese F – J

F is for Female Characters: The age old debate— does Scorsese write/direct weak, underdeveloped female characters? I think the answer, at least, is complicated, and that a lot of his female characters get a lot more flack than they deserve. Are they met with misogyny and sexism and sexual objectification from male characters in his films? Yes, often times they are, that is undeniable. But, some of them also have a lot more spunk than they’re given credit for. Cate Blanchett’s performance as Katharine Hepburn in The Aviator (2004) is a standout, and Lorraine Bracco’s Karen in Goodfellas (1990)...

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The 15 Best Stephen King Movie Adaptations

Here at AE, we’ve spent the entire month of October celebrating our favorite and least favorite horror features.  It only seems right that we close out with a conversation about the reigning King.  With the help of Schyler Martin, we’ve ranked our selections for the fifteen best Stephen King movie adaptations. 15) The Stand miniseries It’s cheesy today, yes, but it’s not the miniseries’ fault that it was made in 1994. If nothing else, an attempt to comprehensively tackle such a massive book is admirable. Say what you will about The Stand, but it’s not lacking in passion. 14) Silver Bullet Great...

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Let’s Talk Trilogies: Our Staff Picks Favorites

All of this celebrating of Edgar Wright’s thematic and stylistic trilogy got us thinking again.  And then talking again.  And a hearty discussion ensued regarding trilogies.  They’re such a prominent fixture in the film canon that it’s difficult to come to any consensus on what makes a good trilogy, let alone to determine what is the best trilogy.  So below, we take turns discussing some of our favorite trilogies, starting off with…you guessed it. Travis Losh: Three Flavours Cornetto Trilogy The Cornetto Trilogy is the best thing to happen to the world since beer was invented. Each of these...

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Audiences Everywhere’s Fall Movie Preview

Introduction Yesterday, we announced the official end of Summer Movie season with Diego Crespo’s Summer Recap.  Today, we’re pulling the team together and welcoming the transition into Autumn with our collection of bold film predictions for the rest of 2014. David Shreve, Jr. Prediction for Best Movie:  Birdman, Release Date: Oct 17, 2014 Alejandro González Iñárritu’s first four films– Amores Perros, 21 Grams, Babel, and Biutiful— have all been brutal opuses of human tragedy, movies so unrelentingly heartbreaking and draining that Steve McQueen wouldn’t be able to view any two of them in quick succession.  However, each of those...

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What is the Best Movie Trailer of All Time?

Introduction So after the tornado of hype that took shape after the release of the most recent Interstellar trailer, a conversation was sparked amongst our staff.  Where did Interstellar‘s new preview rank amongst the greatest trailers of all time? And what was the singular greatest trailer of all time? Turns out, we all had our own ideas and we wanted to include you in the discussion.  The selections are listed below, in no particular order.  Feel free to submit your vote in the comment section. David Shreve – Zero Dark Thirty Somewhere between the pre-production and release of Zero...

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Mid-Year Recap: The Best and Worst Movies of 2014 So Far

Beth Reynolds’ Picks Best of the Year 5. Noah – Aronofsky’s epic Biblical tale remains one of the most ambitious films of the year so far. Russell Crowe brings his usual intense if not slightly unhinged emotion to the role of Noah, lending a sympathetic yet tortured quality to the movie’s namesake character. 4. 22 Jump Street – I’d like to think I have a great sense of humor, but it takes a lot to make me laugh out loud in the theater.  This movie managed to elicit full on belly laughs from me through its entire running time. 3. Veronica Mars –...

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