Category: Cinema Around the World

Celebrating the Monstrous Love of Guillermo del Toro

Over the last month, Audience Everywhere has been celebrating Hispanic filmmakers and representation in recognition of Hispanic Heritage Month. But no celebration of Hispanic contributions to the world of cinema could possibly be complete without mention of Guillermo del Toro. Among other achievements, he is a member of the Three Amigos, as Hollywood has termed them, a triumvirate of critically successful Mexican directors, along with Alfonso Cuarón and Alejandro González Iñárritu. This connection to his country and his countrymen is evident in his work as well as his interactions online. He is consistently supportive of Hispanic filmmakers, without any...

Read More

Man on High Heels Stumbles on a Fine Line

I don’t know how to feel about Man on High Heels. Not because it has the complexity of a Silence or the mystery of a Mulholland Dr. but because it breaks new ground, and I’m not sure it does so in the right way. One paragraph in and a good time to back up: Man on High Heels, or High Heel (하이힐), is a 2014 South Korean movie that no one really talked about. It tells the story of a police detective with a penchant for flashily beating up criminals, Yoon Ji-wook, who wants to put one more crime...

Read More

Happy Australia Day from Audiences Everywhere – Our Seven Favorite Aussie Films

Today is Australia Day, and to celebrate here at Audiences Everywhere, I asked the non-Australia based writers to write about their favourite movies from Down Under. Australia Day celebrates the arrival of the First Fleet from Great Britain to these shores. It is also known as Invasion Day and seen as a day of mourning for the destruction wrought by the arrival of the First Fleet from Great Britain upon the indigenous cultures who already inhabited these lands. Today in Australia, it will be a day of BBQs, parties, protests, and conversations about #ChangetheDate. It’s also a chance for...

Read More

Demon Takes Effort to See Through the Darkness

Overview: On the eve of his wedding, a man discovers a secret that once kept to himself possesses his mind and body. The Orchard; 2015; Rated R; 94 minutes. Tragedy: Any viewing of Demon comes with extra weight when one considers the tragic suicide of its director, Marcin Wrona. The director himself called the atmosphere of the film “suicidal” and took his own life at a film festival where Demon screened. This fact adds to the already-chilling atmosphere of Swierze Górne, Poland, a small village awash in browns and greys and saturated in a heavy fog. Peter (Itay Tiran)...

Read More

20 Horror Movies from 20 Countries

Horror is thriving around the world and is enjoyed by people from every country. Some of the best is produced outside of North America, so sometimes it’s necessary to take a little trip to find something fresh and fun. Join us on a trip across the map (from East to West) with 20 horror movies from 20 countries – there’s something for everyone here no matter what kind of fear you prefer to indulge in. Australia: The Loved Ones (2009) Lola wants a prom date, and she’ll make you pay for turning her down. Not to be confused with...

Read More

Mustang Is a Confident Theatrical Debut

Overview: Five sisters are placed under house arrest after their scandalous behaviour shocks their conservative guardians. CG Cinema; 2015; Rated PG-13; 97 minutes. History: First, a history lesson: Regular readers of these pages (and my devoted fan base) will know that I am an Englishman living in Australia. Prior to this, though, my wife and I lived in Istanbul for three years working as English teachers. We lived there during the Gezi Park uprising and had the experience of being tear-gassed by the police (spoilers: it is rubbish) and also seeing the people of Istanbul react to the corruption and...

Read More

Baba Joon is an Intimate Portrait

Overview: A young Iranian boy living in Israel causes a rift within the family when he rebels against their traditional livelihood of farming turkeys. United King Films; 2015; 91 minutes. Speaking Every Language: The setting of this film might be on the other side of the world, and turkey farming might be an unfamiliar concept to most of us, but the root of this intimate portrait of a father who is stuck in the past and a son who wants to forge his own future is a story that transcends both language and location. Baba Joon examines the universal struggles families face when expectations and...

Read More

Oscars Crash Course: Foreign Language Films

Every year in the lead up to the Academy Awards, there is plenty of buzz surrounding every major category. So much so, you could likely enter your office betting pool with a fair idea of what your safe bets would be, whether you had seen some of the films or not. But what about the under-discussed categories? What about those films that flew under your radar? Some of the best movies of the year aren’t contending for Best Picture. Before you start to panic in the remaining hours before the big event, fear not, because we here at Audiences Everywhere are stepping in to break...

Read More

What Cinema Taught Me About Australia

Australia is very big, and, for just about everyone on Earth, very far away. For someone who grew up in the United Kingdom, a place where you can drive from the top to the bottom in twelve hours, Australia can sometimes seem overwhelming. If you fly from Melbourne to Europe, for the first four hours of the flight you are still in Australia. Leave England and fly four hours east and you’re in Turkey. Australia is also very empty. It has a population of 24 million people. Texas, on the other hand, has a population of 26 million and its landmass could...

Read More

A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence is a Vivid Meditation on Life

Overview: A series of loosely connected vignettes ruminate drolly on the inhumane nature of humanity. Filmproduktion AB; 2015; Rated PG-13; 101 minutes. Gazing into the Mirror: The film begins with a man, someone who has the blank gaze and slumped demeanor of what could be called an idiot, in some museum looking at dead animals in glass boxes. He looks confused, his brow furrowed and his eyes fixated on the once-living exhibits. This man, the idiot, is the audience; a stand-in for the whole of humanity. The man is gawking at the painstakingly constructed fruits of his race’s violent...

Read More

Dheepan Features A Trio Of Brilliant Character Studies

Overview: The eponymous character is given a family of strangers, including a fake-wife and a fake-daughter, none of whom have ever met before, and is dropped in France, an equally strange land, before all their lives are completely reset as they depart the war-torn Sri Lankan jungle that they once called home. UGC Distribution; Not Rated; 2015; 109 Minutes. Father: Dheepan is a freedom fighter. He has fought his war and accepted his loss with dignity. Perhaps it is some ironic sense of redemption that he be reduced to caretaker for the dilapidated French apartment complex Le Pre, the pasture, still...

Read More

The World of Kanako is Creatively Destructive

Overview: A former detective’s search for his missing daughter grows increasingly depraved and horrific as he discovers the secrets about her and himself that led to her disappearance. Drafthouse Films; 2014; Not Rated; 118 minutes. “Do you have dreams?”: Tetsuya Nakashima’s adaptation of Akio Fukamachi’s novel is oppressively dream-like, a sweat-stained and blood-soaked tableau of sin and emptiness. Every scene seems to perspire off the frustrated and drunken steam of Akihiro’s search for his daughter Kanako, the camera lens becoming hazy, but never unfocused, as it follows this journey. The sheer heat of narrative momentum in this detective thriller...

Read More

Victoria is Almost Life-Like

Overview: A young girl working in Berlin befriends four men at the crack of dawn after a night of partying. All is not what it seems, however, as the men share a connection to the underworld that she is now entangled in. Senator Film; 2015; Not Rated; 138 minutes. An Experiment in Real-Time Cinema: Sebastian Schipper’s German film, Victoria, is a two and a half hour film shot in one take and comprised largely of improvised dialogue. While it is this conceit that concludes every mention of the flick, and seemingly at times a veritable gimmick, it is not. The single take here...

Read More

Mexico Barbaro Delivers Solid but Slight Horrors

Overview: In this anthology film, eight directors offer unique takes on horror tied to Mexico’s past and present. Dark Sky Films; 2014: Not Rated; 114 minutes. Cultural Horrors: In whichever country we call home, we’ve become overly familiar with many of our own particular horror staples. We each have conceptions about what defines our nation’s horror canon, what figures and elements are a must. And we know that this definition stems from our histories, and personal fears as a culture.  So there are few things more rewarding as a horror fan than getting to experience another culture’s fears, being...

Read More

Timecrimes Breaks Down Genres

Overview: Héctor (Karra Ejalde) is renovating his home with his wife (Candela Fernández). Looking into a nearby forest with binoculars, he spots what looks like the murder of a young woman. When he attempts to intervene, he inadvertently provokes an increasingly bizarre series of events, and finds that he will do anything to return to ordinary life. Karbo Vantas Entertainment; 2008; Rated R; 92 minutes. Many Things At Once: Timecrimes is both very basic and extremely complicated. Though I will try to leave out the specifics as much as possible, it should be said up-front that this is a time travel...

Read More