Tony Scott: The Patron Saint of Selfless Artists

In a 2009 interview with Rotten Tomatoes, Tony Scott discussed his plans for his intended remake of the 1979 cult classic The Warriors, which included reshaping the story as a modern tale of rival Los Angeles gangs. The vision was expectedly simple, with“10 guys stuck at point B and they need to get back to point A.” In preparation for filming, Scott had started meeting with actual L.A. gangs (always the second guy, never the leader, he explained). It was an interest and approach seemingly mismatched, but oddly appealing given his history of only being predictable by his unpredictability and his reliable affection for his surprisingly human...

Cinema Saint: William Goldman

William Goldman deserves Cinema Sainthood for any single screenplay he’s written. He wrote the fantastic novel The Princess Bride and its equally fantastic movie adaptation. He won an Oscar for his incredible script for All the President’s Men and another one for Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. He wrote Misery, Marathon Man, and had an uncredited hand in shaping some other great scripts. For me though, William Goldman is a Cinema Saint for two books: Adventures in the Screen Trade and Which Lie Did I Tell? In each, he breaks down how movies are made. He cuts through the bullshit and talks about the bullshitters. He takes his own...

Cinema Saint: Pam Grier

With all due respect to Lynda Carter, the real Wonder Woman of the ’70s was Pam Grier. This month AE has been celebrating the impact and legacy of the Blaxploitation films of ’70s, and no discussion of that genre and its influence would be complete without honoring Pam Grier. Before Ellen Ripley, before Sarah Connor, before Buffy Summers, before Furiosa, there was Pam Grier’s cadre of smart and capable action heroes who brought pain to those deserving but with an identifiable sense of humanity. She has become one of the most lasting images of black culture, equally responsible for creating tropes as she would become for...

Cinema Saints: Micha...

From the early American frontier to the contemporary streets of Miami, Michael Mann’s approach to storytelling and filmmaking are defined by atmosphere, attention to detail, and orchestration of complex themes contextualized by equally intricate scene constructions. As an artist uses a paint...

Cinema Saints: Emmanuel Lubezki

In the modern age of widely inclusive discourse and immediately-documented reaction, perhaps nothing in film culture is as bitterly received by film fans as the over-enunciation and repetitiveness of on-the-spot legacy building. The Revenant, the latest film to result from the creative partnership of Director Alejandro González Iñárritu and Cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki, serves as the perfect illustration of this. Before the film’s wide release, it was difficult to measure which publicized narrative was the most worn and grating: the stories of Leonardo DiCaprio’s Oscar-seeking commitment to his role, Iñárritu’s...

Cinema Saint: Harris...

Harrison Ford is like Michael Jackson. He isn’t a musician, but he is a genre unto himself. Michael Jackson was so influential to other artists and musicians that he spawned a slew of imitators and worshippers who are pop stars and R&B stars, but really the genre they work in is Michael...

Cinema Saints: Guillermo del Toro

  Guillermo del Toro, who celebrated his 51st birthday just last week (on October 9th, to be exact) and who will no doubt have even more reason to celebrate this week with the release of Crimson Peak, seems to be more active and more revered than ever before. Though his career spans more than two decades, it seems that many are just now catching on to del Toro’s fanboy brand of genius. Or, perhaps it is that he is finally getting to apply his impeccable imagination to more and more projects that are actually worthy of his mad, brilliant vision. Either way, fans new and old of the Mexican-born filmmaker can rejoice in del Toro’s...

Cinema Saints: Richard Linklater

Richard Linklater is a connoisseur of the everyday. He captures the intricacies and trivialities of regular life, showing the importance in the small, making the common and unimpressive grand beyond belief. In some ways, Linklater is like Terrence Malick in how he reveals the wonder in the mundane through his films. Where Malick is focused on nature on a large scale, Linklater points his camera toward the far more ordinary. Summer nights, high school parties, and other assorted moments that seem so simple, so regular, relatable even, are turned into events of mammoth meaning and truth. In one of his very best movies, Waking Life, Linklater...

Cinema Saints: Judd Apatow

Judd Apatow, as a writer, a producer, and a director, has become something of a brand name within the realm of the studio comedy. Seemingly, and going on 20 plus years in the business, Apatow can do no wrong, at least when it comes to making sure that the funniest, most intelligent, unique voices in comedy get their time to shine under the spotlight afforded by his acumen for high production values in the field of comedy writing. While it might be easy to poke holes in some of his lesser works, with Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues and Drillbit Taylor standing as two of the biggest embarrassments in commercial entertainment for all parties...

Cinema Saints: Arnold Schwarzenegger

  Arnie’s career is inexplicable. His first Hollywood movie, Hercules in New York, is about as bad as it gets. Both its plot and lead actor are unintelligible, and the result is laughable. If you showed someone this movie and said that the lead actor, a giant, muscle-bound foreigner would go on to become one of Hollywood’s biggest names, and eventually the governor of California, they would laugh in your face. Even now (after his reign in Hollywood has largely culminated) there is something incomprehensible about him. How did we accept that this man could play an American cop? He has a broad Austrian accent, and the physique of a body...

Cinema Saints: The Wachowskis

When thinking of filmmakers who have completely altered the landscape of film, brother-sister duo Andy and Lana Wachowski are the first to come to my mind. Few directors work to push the boundaries of cinema in unexpected ways with each new movie in quiet the same way that these two have done, and continue to do. The Wachowskis rarely disappoint in this regard, delivering films that boldly defy the traditional constraints of film structure, narrative, and aesthetic design. The kind of risk-taking found in films like The Matrix, Speed Racer, and Cloud Atlas alone is enough to qualify the Wachowskis for Cinema Sainthood. The fact that they...

Cinema Saints: Christopher Lee

Sir Christopher Lee probably had a more interesting life before he became an actor than most of us could ever hope to have without ever becoming one at all. But we’re not here to talk about his military service, as the man himself never liked to talk much about it either. Rather, we’re here to talk about Sir Christopher Lee the actor, in order to better establish his sainthood as an icon of cinema, and to mark his mortal passing in kind. To begin, Christopher Lee had one of those fantastic careers in which he was a cultural icon twice over.  In the 1960’s and 1970’s, he was a maestro of horror movie monsters, becoming one...

Cinema Saints: John Turturro

John Turturro lives within the margins. Normally, that might not be considered a complimentary thing to say of an actor. Yet, in Turturro’s case, I feel there is no better way to describe him. The first role Turturro ever had was “Man at Table” in Martin Scorsese’s great 1980 film, Raging Bull. He started small, an extra, and from there he only began to slowly fill up the margins of cinema history. There are stars like, say, Tom Cruise or Daniel Day-Lewis who are born leading men, and aside from a few notable exceptions (Tropic Thunder for Cruise), stay in the front lines until their career ends, if it ever really does. Turturro is not a...

Cinema Saints: John Carpenter

John Carpenter works in two genres: horrors and westerns. The temptation would be to say he does science fiction too, but you would be wrong. Even his most sci-fi-y works like They Live and Escape from New York follow the western premise of a lone stranger comes into town and gets embroiled in a situation he has to straighten out. The same applies to Big Trouble in Little China, which actually was originally written as a Western before being updated to the modern day-set wacky headfuck that it became. He deals in men of few words (or a ton of words as in Little China when Kurt Russell’s character will not shut the hell up) who see an...

Cinema Saints: Stan Lee

You may be wondering why Stan Lee qualifies as a Cinema Saint. Though he’s not exactly involved in any aspect of the films’ production, a Marvel movie just doesn’t feel complete without a cameo from Stan the Man. He’s managed to appear in most of the modern Marvel movies, including the animated Big Hero 6. The only exceptions are the Ghost Rider films, X2, X-Men Origins: Wolverine and X-Men: Days of Future Past (do you even realize what you’ve done, Singer?). I felt obliged to share my appreciation for Mr. Lee when a notorious group of “critics” counted his cameos among the negative aspects of Marvel’s movies. Honestly, I don’t see how it’s...

Cinema Saints: Mia Wasikowska

Still relatively new to Hollywood, Mia Wasikowska has proven herself to be one of the true powerhouse talents of her generation. Though her work is consistently stellar, Wasikowska’s rise to prominence has been noticeably slower than that of other industry newcomers. In an age where we have seen numerous nobodies grow into full blown movie stars in short periods of time, Mia Wasikowska has sadly flown under the radar for most of the general public. Despite haven proven herself time and again over the past few years since her emergence, Wasikowska’s performances have remained mostly underrated by the standards of other breakout mega stars...

Cinema Saints: John Cazale

Here at Audiences Everywhere, we love movies. We must do, because we talk, watch, and write about them all the time. We don’t love all movies (as a look into our garbage pile will prove) but we give each movie we see a fair shake and can even find the good in bad movies. However there are negative factions on the internet who, for whatever reason, seem to only want to find the bad in movies. They pass their time and in some cases make their living pointing out all the tiny faults in movies, and then they present these things to you as though they are doing you a favour. They seem fixated on letting you know that the movies you love aren’t...