Weekly Clickables: Cloverfield, Freaks and Geeks, ...

In this week’s Weekly Clickables, we have throwbacks, trailers, and analysis, which is all good stuff, and a nice variety to get your week started. Because I’ve been re-watching Freaks and Geeks, I thought I’d include this essay from a like-minded media consumer, courtesy of Chicago Now. Although Fences has gotten mixed reviews, there are many great examples of film adaptations of stage plays. NewNowNext put together this list a while ago, but it is still relevant. Here’s a video about the connections between Cloverfield and 10 Cloverfield Lane, courtesy of Bloody Disgusting. And a trailer for the upcoming horror...

Weekly Clickables: Taboo, Sci-Fi, & Women In ...

Our Weekly Clickables were a little harder to gather this week than usual, as it was the first week of the year, but we still found a few items worth your time. First, Flavorwire compiled their most anticipated films of 2017. Gwilym Mumford at The Guardian wrote a review of Taboo, the new series starring Tom Hardy, which will give you an idea of what to expect from the show. Nerd Much? updated their list of upcoming sci-fi movies. 2017 promises to be a good year for science fiction. At The Verge, Kaitlyn Tiffany explains her resolution to spend her money on films created by women. And if you want to join Kaitlyn Tiffany in that goal, check...

Weekly Clickables: Remembering Carrie Fisher &...

We made it to 2017! I wisely made no resolutions last year, and so have arrived in the new year having accomplished everything I set out to do. I hope you have, too. But now to what you came for: our Weekly Clickables. This week, we have a remembrance of Carrie Fisher through Leia’s theme, a look at what Netflix got right in the past year, a look at who we lost in 2016 and how they contributed to the discussion of gender, and a bit of Trump totally misunderstanding an important piece of culture. This discussion with Errol Morris about the time Donald Trump completely misunderstood Citizen Kane is fascinating and, of course, terrifying,...

Weekly Clickables: F...

Greetings, and happy almost new year. This week, we have a little of this and a little of that in our Weekly Clickables, some seasonal, and some not. Enjoy! First, an interview with Mandy Moore, choreographer of La La Land, courtesy of The Verge. Next, a look at Katherine Johnson, a West...

Weekly Clickables: A...

This week’s Weekly Clickables are without theme. You’d expect a holiday focus, right? Well, not this year, as you’ve probably seen the best holiday-related lists anyway. In this post, we have a short film, an essay, poll results, ghost stories, and a review, of which you’re likely to enjoy at...

Weekly Clickables: Transformers: Boogie Knights Tr...

In this week’s Weekly Clickables, we have a look at La La Land, new movie posters for old movies, sex scenes, and Transformers meets Boogie Nights. First, The Hollywood Reporter put together a summary of its Women in Entertainment event, which includes some interesting thoughts from successful women in Hollywood and the media. Rolling Stone looked at La La Land and its resurrection of the Hollywood musical. Photographic artist Jordan Bolton has created posters for iconic movies using only select props and sets from those movies. The effect is like an inventory of a movie’s design that reminds you of moments you love and works like a...

Weekly Clickables: Star Trek & Star Wars Hist...

In this week’s Weekly Clickables, we have a couple haunting trailers, a couple items relating to Star Wars and Star Trek history, and a piece about the coming together of two Virginia Tech alumni to make a film about understanding and embracing gender identity. First, a trailer for Hideo Kojima’s new video game Death Stranding, which leaves you needing to play this game if only to understand the premise. Next, a Star Trek IV writer on how Eddie Murphy almost was a part of the film, courtesy of The Hollywood Reporter. An oral history of the 1978 Star Wars Holiday Special, which was a thing. A story about two Virginia Tech alumni reconnecting...

Weekly Clickables: Holidays & Black Mirror

Our Weekly Clickables this week is, naturally, holiday themed. Advertisements and fairy lights are everywhere, so why fight it? First, IndieWire put together a holiday movie preview. Next, check out a compilation of the 20 best shopping scenes, courtesy of Glamour. Now, if you’re in the northern hemisphere, you expect to be cold until May 2017. Thankfully, Nylon helpfully put together a list of the 15 warmest movies. If you grew up in the ’90s and had cable, you’ll appreciate this fascinating oral history of the Double Dare obstacle course, courtesy of The A.V. Club. Finally, NPR correspondent Lakshmi Singh interviewed Gugu...

Weekly Clickables: The Work of Denis Villeneuve &#...

Happy Monday, dear readers, and to those in the US who are celebrating this week, Happy Thanksgiving! This week’s Weekly Clickables include some artwork, some new film creations, and a thoughtful look at the work of Denis Villeneuve. First, Fede Alvarez is working on a Don’t Breathe sequel, as well as directing The Girl in the Spider’s Web, courtesy of Dread Central. Per Screen Rant, Robert Eggers, who directed the 2016 indie horror hit The Witch, is doing a remake of Nosferatu. A group of artists have created posters for sequels that never happened, and they’re all up for sale. Speaking of art, check out the trailer for...

Weekly Clickables: Casting Dumbledore & Writi...

In this installment of Weekly Clickables, we have a couple election-related items, a look at the writer behind Arrival, and speculation on the casting of Dumbledore in the Fantastic Beasts series. First, NPR discussed Arrival short story writer Ted Chiang’s approach to writing, which proved to be inspiring for all current and former technical writers. Screen Rant put together a list of 15 actors who could play a younger Albus Dumbledore. And kudos to them for making an effort to choose gay actors for this role. Daniel Fienberg at The Hollywood Reporter had some interesting thoughts on Kate McKinnon’s performance of “Hallelujah” and Dave...

Weekly Clickables: Baseball at the Movies & T...

In this week’s Weekly Clickables, we have a couple of interesting reviews and a list of great baseball games. There’s something for everyone. Enjoy! First, an interesting review of Japanese Girls Never Die from the Tokyo Film Fest, courtesy of Variety. Also, Quentin Tarantino is being predictably insufferable about his upcoming retirement, but the internet may already be tired of that, per The Guardian. Perhaps, after last week’s World Series, you need more great baseball. As luck would have it, Nerdist put together a list of the 9 best fictional baseball games on film. Finally, if you value silence more than the average person, check out...

Weekly Clickables: Heels & Horror

In this our Weekly Clickables this week, we have mostly horror, but also a review, thoughts on footwear, and some unusual background performances. First, courtesy of the Film4 “Horror Heads” series, an assemblage of Hollywood’s top genre directors – including Tim Burton, Eli Roth, and M. Night Shyamalan – converge to discuss their longstanding and undying love for horror.  In The Atlantic, Megan Garber wrote about women in movies running in heels. Cracked put together this compilation of odd moments from background characters. TV Guide presents a list of the funniest horror movies for those of us who can’t...

Weekly Clickables: Childish Gambino Meets Stranger...

Greetings, readers. I hope you are all ready for another week of Weekly Clickables. We have a few items to share with you from other talented writers and movie fans, which may help you in those dull moments between now and Friday. First, this YouTube channel Ky Edits remixed Childish Gambino’s “Bonfire” with the Stranger Things theme song, and it’s crazy good. Slate explores whether crime shows, a genre that often relies on tradition, really needs to be updated. Newsweek has kindly shared some of the insane stories behind the many, many times Donald Trump has appeared on TV and in movies. Apparently, he’s easy...

Weekly Clickables: Elfman Scores Trump & Horr...

Another week, another collection of Weekly Clickables, featuring content from minds across the Internet. This time, we have an essay and a video relevant to the election – one is serious and one is light, so they balance each other – as well as a couple lists. First, at Vox, Alissa Wilkinson dove deep into one of the more challenging films to discuss in recent years, Nate Parker’s The Birth of a Nation. Next, Danny Elfman composed a horror movie score for Funny or Die to accompany a clip of Donald Trump stalking Hillary Clinton on the debate stage last week, and it’s the best thing we’ve seen or heard in a while. Vanity...

Weekly Clickables: Power Rangers First Look &...

In our regular installment of Weekly Clickables, we have a couple of throwbacks to the 90s, a contest, and a list pertinent to the election season. First, here is an interview with VIFF award winner and creator of The X-Files, Chris Carter, courtesy of Daily Hive. Next, if you have not already, check out the teaser trailer for the upcoming Power Rangers movie. Here’s a contest to win a seriously amazing werewolf replica statue from The Howling, courtesy of ComingSoon.net. In 2012, TIME helpfully put together a list of the 10 best debate scenes, which you might feel like revisiting now. Finally, check out the first official trailer for...

Weekly Clickables: The Topicality of Luke Cage �...

Our Weekly Clickables this week are heavy on movie trailers and cultural relevance. Without further explanation, let’s dive right in.  First, an article from the Huffington Post discussing why Luke Cage is exactly what we need right now. Next, a brilliant article from New York magazine on the 1999 film Election and how watching it again in 2016 creates an experience more akin to a horror film that the creators quite possibly intended to invoke originally. This holiday season, Denzel Washington and Viola Davis star in a film adaptation of August Wilson’s play Fences. Check out the teaser trailer here. Speaking of trailers, The Wrap has put...

Weekly Clickables: The Lovers and the Despot and a...

This week, we have a couple of reviews and something I’m more excited about than is probably normal: a list of period dramas arranged chronologically by the time in which they’re set, with linked reviews for each. First, The Guardian review of The Lovers and the Despot, whose story (if you check the Clickables religiously, as I’m sure you do), you will remember from an NPR interview we shared a few months back. Earlier in the week while browsing for three characters that describe me (you know you at least thought about it, even if you did not participate), I stumbled across The Silver Petticoat Review, which in addition to having a handy...

Weekly Clickables: A Discussion on Marvel Movie Sc...

In our regular installment of Weekly Clickables, we explore the world of music with some discussion of film score composition, and a look at the new Radiohead music video for “Present Tense” directed by Paul Thomas Anderson. Also, for good measure, and to continue warming up for the horror movie season, a list! First, Every Frame A Painting discusses the forgettable scores of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, and how they are symptomatic of the problem with modern day blockbuster compositions. And in a second supplementary video, further examples of lackluster blockbuster scores are given. Uploaded by Australian film and music researcher Dan...

Weekly Clickables: Thoughts On Auteurs and Some Ba...

Another week, another collection of movie-related finds in our Weekly Clickables. Enjoy an interview or two, a discussion of the separation of film from the politics of the auteur, and a dip into horror, as Halloween is just around the corner, after all. First, though, here’s a clip of Kevin Smith recounting how his daughter helped him find joy in film-making again, via Yahoo! Movies. Next, an interview with Ron Howard about his upcoming Beatles documentary, Eight Days A Week, via Fast Company. Bob Chipman examines whether we should (or can) separate film from the politics of its creator in his new video “The Artist and the...

Weekly Clickables: The Evolution of Stop Motion, T...

We have a nice assortment of film-related tidbits for you this week, including a reflection on the summer movie season, a lesson in politics from The Truman Show, and of course some Gene Wilder. First, Matt Singer over at Screen Crush reflects on 2016’s summer movie season. Enjoy his use of statistics to back up his feelings about the season’s movie options. Nerdwriter shows us what The Truman Show can teach us about politics. Matt Grosinger at The Nerdist wrote about his experience sitting in on Andrew Bird’s Live from the Great Room, in which Bird and a guest (this time Matt Berninger) jam in the great room of Bird’s house.  Following...

Weekly Clickables: The Best 100 Films of the 21st ...

Another Monday, another collection of Weekly Clickables featuring a fine selection of film-related odds and ends. First, a list of the best 100 films of the 21st century, according to a BBC Culture survey of film critics and curators world-wide. Next, a short video showing a few romantic comedies, remade with feminism in mind, courtesy of The Huffington Post. Io9 shared a video exploring some of the world from Kubo and the Two Strings. At NPR, a Q&A on how the new Ben-Hur compares to its predecessors. Finally, five things to know about the upcoming James Baldwin documentary, courtesy of Kreyolicious. That’s it for this week! Check back...

Weekly Clickables: Olympic Films & Another Ru...

In our latest Weekly Clickables installment, we have a few lists, a short interview with Sian Davies, and a discussion of Darren Aronofsky’s Noah. First, at Short Film Stuff, an interview with Sian Davies, who, among other things, directed a few episodes of the delightful Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries. If you want a non-partisan and scientific approach to the “which superhero is the best” argument, check out the best superhero according to science, courtesy of Cinema Blend. The Olympics are full of film-worthy stories, so here is a list of the top ten Olympic-themed movies of all time (up until the present, that is) from Newsday. ...

Weekly Clickables: Who Should Play Lando & He...

Greetings, dear readers. In our regular installment of Weekly Clickables, we have a look at animated films for adults (and kids), some suggestions for who should play young Lando Calrissian, and other non-Star Wars related items. First, Variety provided a list of the 10 greatest animated films for adults: http://variety.com/gallery/10-greatest-animated-films-adults-sausage-party-anomalisa-persepolis-fantastic-mr-fox/ /Film put together this list of actors who should play young Lando Calrissian after the rumor broke that Donald Glover might get the job: http://www.slashfilm.com/15-actors-who-should-play-young-lando-calrissian/ For those of...

Weekly Clickables: Stranger Things, Plausibility, ...

Ah, the last days of summer, when children won’t admit that they’re bored but secretly want to be back at school, and adults find themselves buying clothes for the new school year, even though they don’t attend school and haven’t outgrown anything in a decade (except as a result of a lagging metabolism). What better time for distraction. Check out our latest Weekly Clickables below. First, Emma Watson interviews the author of Persepolis on the evolving position of women in Iran: http://www.vogue.com/13462655/emma-watson-interviews-marjane-satrapi/ Or, there’s this BBC article about the real-life hackers helping Mr. Robot seem believable,...

Weekly Clickables: For the Love of Spock & St...

We have a little bit of everything for you with our Weekly Clickables today, including a couple of interviews, some storytelling tips, a defense of an arguably indefensible mother, and a new movie trailer. First, a defense of Mrs. Bates, courtesy of Birth.Movies.Death, that mounts the argument for Norman Bates’s mother’s innocence in the face of cinematic perjury. If you love Spock, you have a trailer in support of For the Love of Spock, a documentary created by Adam Nimoy about his father, whose portrayal of the Star Trek character built a legion of devoted fans. In this interview published by The Guardian, Anna Gunn discusses...

Weekly Clickables: Movies for Kids & Donald T...

Welcome back to another installment of our Weekly Clickables! This week we’ve got a number of movies for younger viewers (and their content-minded parents), and a couple of other choice options. If you’re a young parent and need to know which movies are not only suitable but must be seen by children of all ages, then look no further than the top five movies that your kid has to see. If you were wondering what directing Donald Trump might entail, look no further than this personal recounting by director Oliver Stone on his brief encounter on the set of Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps, courtesy of Wired. Not all teen-dystopias are...

Weekly Clickables: Film Noir, Running on Screen &#...

Happy Monday, folks. We found some great Weekly Clickables to share with you and take your mind off the massive headache of a spreadsheet you have to work on today (or whatever form the mundane takes for you). First, Mark Viera gives his opinion on the best in the film noir genre. Next is an interview with Alexi Pappas, a showrunner (among many other things) who created a series of short films about running. I watched and enjoyed A Young Doctor’s Notebook this weekend (a good fit for Daniel Radcliffe’s acting style), which led us to this look at Harry Potter stars who made the transition to television. Emma Watson, we know, has taken her...

Weekly Clickables: Thoughts on Sulu & Lessons...

In our Weekly Clickables this week, we have some transformations, an inside look at the hermit state of North Korea, and an opinion piece on the lessons a disappointing summer movie season can teach the movie industry. First up, The LA Times gives us a taste of Under The Sun, a documentary about North Korea. Next, Simon Pegg weighs in on the controversy regarding George Takei’s response to the announcement that Star Trek Beyond’s Sulu is gay, wherein both actors have thoughtful reasons behind their supported positions. For something lighter, check out clever make-up transformations into well-known movie characters from Lucia Pitallis.  Last...

Weekly Clickables: DeLoreans & Zoolander 2...

Happy Fourth of July, American readers! For those of you not out grilling or setting off fireworks dangerously close to your neighbor’s house, we have a few Weekly Clickables to help you pass your Monday. With opportunity dwindling with each passing year, there are summer blockbuster hits that aren’t aimed at younger audiences. It’s just a matter of where to find them, courtesy of The Guardian.  If owning a DeLorean is out of reach for your pocketbook, why not an iPhone case that looks just like it? Can you say “take my money?” The Present is a short animated film that reminds us there are more important things than...

Weekly Clickables: Slapstick Humor, Haiku, and Gar...

Another Monday, another Weekly Clickables post! This week, we have some haikus, some self-reflection, and a look at the host of the long-running radio variety show A Prairie Home Companion. First, The AV Club continue their series Polite Fight with a discussion of the cinematic choices that made Game of Thrones‘ “Battle of the Bastards” so effective. When much of the country tunes in to a week focused on stories about shark habits, shark attacks, and goes to see shark movies, it’s time for some self-examination. Over at Vox, Aja Romana explores why we love shark movies. For those who enjoy short and sweet reviews, Review...

Weekly Clickables: The Lobster & Original Ide...

Greetings, readers! We have another week before us, and so we share another handful of Weekly Clickables featuring all of the best interesting film-related items around the world wide web. This week, we have some film analysis, an interview with Colin Farrell, and a tribute to LGBT cinema, among other things. Read on and enjoy! Lessons from the Screenplay is a new YouTube channel run by Michael Tucker which examines screenwriting techniques and analyzes great movie scripts. Last week, Entertainment Weekly shared a video essay that pays tribute to LGBT cinema. Amid continuing critical discussion and viewer debate surrounding The Lobster, you...

Weekly Clickables: The Best of Human and AI Achiev...

Greetings, readers. This week in the Clickables, we have sci-fi written by artificial intelligence, some new John Williams music, art featuring directors, and thoughts on favorites in the horror and superhero genres. Enjoy! Check out this bizarre short film written by AI (I think we have a ways to go before screenplay writing is automated, I am happy to say). If you want a taste of John Williams’s score for Steven Spielberg’s upcoming film The BFG, you can listen at the John Williams Fan Network. There’s an argument to be had about superhero movies getting better and better. We shouldn’t forget about the real best...

Weekly Clickables: Fandom, Comics, and a Cultural ...

Happy Monday, dear readers! We have some great Weekly Clickables to share with you this week. We focus on comic books with looks at adaptations of Superman, Spiderman, and a documentary about the X-Men comics, but also some discussion some rather specific fandom and the late Muhammad Ali. In the weekly podcast Who Won the Week, Blastr look back at the week that was and the stories that are blowing up the geek-o-sphere. This week, they are joined by Lindsay Ellis and Alex Zalben to discuss whether or not fandom is broken. Notorious YouTube film buff Bob Chipman continues his video series Really That Good with an exploration of what makes...

Weekly Clickables: Finding Dory Petition & Gh...

I am back from vacation (unfortunately), but at least my work week is short. If yours seems interminable, try checking out our Weekly Clickables for some of our very best film-related finds to help the hours go by. First, Owen Gleiberman of Variety writes about what we’ll need from the next James Bond film following director Sam Mendes’ recent departure. Independent filmmaker Ashley Lynch examines boys’ undeniable hatred of the new Ghostbusters movie. What if all of the Pixar stories are related? And I don’t mean Easter Eggs appearing in each movie. The Pixar Theory provides evidence of how the movies are...

Weekly Clickables: Mulholland Drive & The Nex...

It’s a Monday! And I have two reasons for why this Monday looks much brighter than others. First, it’s the Monday prior to Memorial Day weekend, meaning a three day weekend is on its way. Secondly, it’s a Monday, and Olan Rogers’ story of an unforgettable Monday makes the beginning of any work week a little more bearable. So without further ado, here are our Weekly Clickables. The Nerdwriter brings viewers a video essay that explores how David Lynch manipulates his audience in Mulholland Drive. Film Crit Hulk returns with a long essay on The Revenant, Mad Max, and the nexus of cinematic language. Astronauts, spanning...

Weekly Clickables: The Devil’s Backbone Anal...

Hi folks! I hope you all had a lovely weekend. I sure did. Of course, a lovely weekend makes Monday that much more difficult, but that’s where our Weekly Clickables come in. On that note, we’ve found a few items to distract you from the humdrum work week. Fangirls and boys go wild when they get a mention in a tweet. But just imagine the level of excitement when Pixar super-fan Adam received a handwritten and illustrated letter from Pete Docter, the director of Monsters, Inc., Up, and Inside Out. At Hitfix, Drew McWeeny shares a candid confession about his childhood and discusses the impracticality of violent nerd anger in a culture that has...

Weekly Clickables: The Marvel v DC Rivalry & ...

Readers in the U.S., I hope you did something thoughtful for Mother’s Day. Everyone else, welcome to another week of Weekly Clickables! Today, we have a new angle on movie posters, the original Alice in Wonderland film, and some comic book movie discussion. Birth. Movies. Death. offers a look back at the rivalry between Marvel and DC over the last 60 years. At TIME, writer Ta-Nehisi Coates and actor Chadwick Boseman talk about the importance of bringing Black Panther to the big screen. If you don’t want to watch all of the picks for IMDb’s Top 250 movies, you can peruse them in short in this 2 1/2 minute video from YouTube user...

Weekly Clickables: Magic Mike, Pixar, & More

This week, we have an analysis of the Magic Mike movies, a reflective piece on film’s power to bring people together, and an unbelievable story of an actress, her director ex-husband, and the extreme measures of their most powerful fan. Crime author Megan Abbott wrote about how watching the movie Calvary revived the bond she grew up sharing with her mother over films that moved them emotionally. A This American Life episode tells the story of a South Korean film star and her ex-husband, both kidnapped by Kim Jong Il and forced to work together to create good North Korean movies. Pixar is known for its  company branded easter eggs, but they...

Weekly Clickables: Movie Quotes as Charts and Clas...

This week, we have something for visual learners, a few things for Disney fans, and plenty for movie lovers of all kinds. Let’s dive right in. For those channeling their inner Marshall from How I Met Your Mother, the Famous Movie Quotes as Charts poster serves as an entertaining and informative piece of artwork for any movie buff. Besides award-worthy nominations, some movies don’t even hit blockbuster status, although they may deserve notice. This list compiles some interesting blockbuster failures. Granted, our very own honorable mention, The Iron Giant, should have been a part of the list. In recent years, a huge shift places 3D...

Weekly Clickables: Live Like Deadpool & This ...

Here we are again, another week gone! We found quite a lot to share with you over the past few days, including data on the most popular movie by U.S. state, a closer look at The Good Dinosaur, and an interview with the writer of the new Black Panther comic book run, among other things. Over at High Existence, Deadpool gets existential in how to achieve his level of badassery and a better life. This map of the U.S. shows the most popular movie set in each state, and while some are self-explanatory others seem random. Natalie Kramer, a writer for National Geographic, finds plenty of geographical and astronomical wonders in her review for This...

Weekly Clickables: W...

Let’s face it, Katherine wasn’t kidding when she said, “April is the cruellest month.”  The animated works of Karen Aqua come together in a special retrospective exhibition at the Harvard Film Archive. The 1951 adaptation of Richard Wright’s novel Native Son has...

Weekly Clickables: B...

April is the cruellest month. Luckily, we found some good pieces to help divert you from stirred up memories, or a long work week. Tom Hiddleston stepped in on Chicago 32 to provide some commentary on a string of bad weather across the Midwest. We don’t know why, but it’s amazing....

Weekly Clickables: G...

Happy Monday, dear readers! This week on the Clickables, we have an artful piece of cultural criticism, along with some material from Archer and an interview with Garry Shandling. Amidst the internet’s windy storm of discussion centered on the superficial topics of fan reaction and...

Weekly Clickables: Birds, Batman, & Michael M...

Another weekend gone, but, as usual, we are here to help you through the work week! Check out what our staff has been enjoying recently. First, at Birth. Movies. Death., Priscilla Page writes about the relationship between Rocky Balboa and Apollo Creed throughout the Rocky series, along with some interesting context on their real-life influences. Michael Mann announced the launch of Michael Mann Books, an imprint that will gather a group of writers to crank out a series of novels that will simultaneously be adapted to film. And one of the first of these is said to be a prequel to Heat. At The Washington Post, Nicholas Lund discusses how...

Weekly Clickables: Irish Movies and Malick Stories

Greetings, readers! In this week’s Clickables, we have a couple of lists, a different view of Fight Club, and an insider’s take on working with Terrence Malick. For those of you missing Downton Abbey, we found Vulture’s list of 11 period dramas to help fill the void. I can personally vouch for many of these. Next, Irish Central has put together a list of the best Irish movies. Business Insider offered the weirdest insight into what it’s like to work with Terrence Malick thanks to an account shared by Thomas Lennon, of Reno 911 fame, who worked on the director’s latest film Knight of Cups. Richard Trammel has created an edit of...

Weekly Clickables: N...

Happy Monday, fellow film fans! Today, we have an eclectic assortment of interviews, reviews, letters, and suggestions, all very well worth your time. First, an interview with The Hateful Eight cinematographer and long-time Quentin Tarantino collaborator Robert Richardson. Next, a look at...

Weekly Clickables: The 2016 Oscars & More

Greetings, readers! I hope you enjoyed the Academy Awards last night! To help you shake off the post-Oscars blues, we have gathered a few interesting finds: We’re all familiar with the #OscarsSoWhite controversy, and the boycott of the Oscars by some fed up celebrities. The International Business Times looked into what they did instead. For parents (or the young at heart, or whoever), Romper has compiled a list of 6 children’s books to read before their film adaptations are released later this year. Super Deluxe presents the trailer for Straight Outta Compton if it were an Oscars contender. Paul Giamatti stars as the brave white man...

Weekly Clickables: Lots of Comedy With a Touch of ...

Greetings, readers! Welcome to this week’s clickables! Today, we have some comedy, a curated list from Robert Eggers, and more from WTF with Marc Maron. Many young adults who grew up in the late 1990s and early 2000s may have fond memories of watching the popular Japanese anime series Dragonball Z. What many fans might not remember, or at least not quite as well, is the 2009 American live-action film adaptation of the franchise that all but put the series to bed going into the 2010s. But not all fans of the property have been so lucky, as YouTube movie reviewer Chris Stuckmann can attest to, with all of the flair, outrage, and hyperbole...

Weekly Clickables: Presidents Day Featuring Johnny...

Greetings, readers, and congratulations on surviving another Valentine’s Day. It’s likely you said the wrong thing and bought the wrong gift, but at least it will be a year before you do it again. If you need some distraction, however, check out some things we found enjoyable this week. First, some self-promotion: since today is Presidents Day in the U.S., check out last year’s list of our favorite movie presidents. Next, read a piece in The Atlantic about the influence of director David Lynch. If you haven’t already, enjoy Funny Or Die’s The Art of the Deal, starring Johnny Depp as presidential candidate Donald Trump. Or, if you are...

Weekly Clickables: The Same Old Story & Socia...

Greetings, all. This week, we have a few looks at film and storytelling, generally, as well as a couple in-depth discussions and analysis of specific works. First, John Yorke of The Atlantic examines that we’ve been telling the same story since we first begun to tell stories and only the superficial elements have changed. Elsewhere, the scintillating and insightful film video essayist popularly known as Nerdwriter1 on YouTube offers an expectedly brilliant investigation into writer-director Martin McDonagh’s thrilling and deeply complicated 2008 theatrical debut In Bruges. By specifically examining McDonagh’s exquisitely...