Category: Reviews

Inception

Overview: A man capable of influencing dreams must perform what is thought to be impossible; planting an original thought in someone’s mind without them knowing. Warner Bros. Pictures. 2010. Rated PG-13. 148 Minutes. A Unique Mind: Writer and director Christopher Nolan’s mind works on its own special level. Previous films from Nolan (Memento, The Prestige, The Dark Knight) have shown his ability to work well with mental and psychological elements. Inception takes these elements and expands on them exponentially. Nolan’s greatest gift, on full display here, is his ability to concoct this complex, layered labyrinth of ideas and successfully...

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Drive

Overview: A reticent mechanic who doubles as a Hollywood stuntman with superb driving skills gets into some unwanted trouble when he helps out a woman. 2011; Rated R; 100 minutes All kinds of cool: Nicholas Winding Refn (Bronson, Valhalla Rising) brings us this ultraviolent crime drama starring Ryan Gosling (Blue Valentine, The Notebook). Refn is known for his highly-stylized approach to filming. Here, with cinematographer Newton Thomas Sigel, Refn uses unique camera angles to create a neo-noir look and feel with an unconventional perspective. The opening chase scene, for example, was shot by Refn sitting inside of the car...

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Argo

Overview: Ben Affleck directs, produces, and stars in a real movie about making a fake movie in his depiction of events that took place during the Iran hostage crisis. Warner Brothers; 2012; Rated R; 120 minutes. Argo Fuck Yourself:  Argo dominated the awards scene and every 2012 end of the year list.  By the time the Oscars rolled around, chances are you felt like you’d been beaten over the head with how great of a year 2012 was for Ben Affleck.  I am not Affleck’s number one fan, so I was annoyed and naturally skeptical when I finally settled...

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Ferris Bueller’s Day Off

Overview: A high school senior plays hooky, and it’s more entertaining than it has any right to be. Paramount Pictures; 1986; PG-13; 102 minutes. The Good: John Hughes’s fourth outing as a director results in what might be his finest work. The premise is simple: Ferris convinces his uptight best friend Cameron to play hooky with him. Ferris’s girlfriend Sloane rounds out the group of truants, and they go on an adventure in Chicago. Their idea of a good time? Eating a nice meal, going to a parade, and watching a baseball game. That’s it. The result is completely...

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Adaptation

Overview: Screenwriter Charlie Kaufman writes himself into his movie script adaptation of a Susan Orlean novel about a colorful orchid thief.  2002; Rated R; 114 Minutes.   Miracle Number One:With Nicolas Cage taking on dual roles as twin brothers Charlie and Donald Kaufmann and casual collector of Oscar nominations Meryl Streep in top form as Susan Orlean, it’s almost inconceivable that any actor could steal the screen.  Chris Cooper does just that.  His portrayal of John Laroche, the eccentric collector for whom all of this exists, lends the character elements of hilarity, humanity, and heartache, and provides the viewer...

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The Raid: Redemption

Overview: Members of a small SWAT team battle their way up a high-rise apartment complex which houses the operation of a ruthless drug lord. 2011; Rated R; 93 Minutes Strengths: The Raid: Redemption displays some of the most innovative and awe-inspiring fight choreography in the history of film. I wanted to rewind and rewatch individual scenes in the midst of my initial watch. Matt Flannery’s cinematography and the production design establish visuals of apocalyptic disarray where the orgy of violence is comfortably framed. With this single feature, the action-movie genre just jumps out of its deathbed and lays waste to its hospice staff. Weaknesses: The narrative structure is the stuff of basic video games (fight, move up a floor, fight harder) and, for those who care, the actual story and the personalities of its inhabitants are of little concern to this movie’s ambition. The actors don’t so much perform as dance. Also, if you watch this movie in company, you are going to embarrass yourself emulating the fight scenes after. Best Scene: When the door closes behind the two brothers and the short but deadly assassin. A ballet for bros. Watch This Movie if You Like: Shoot’em Up, Game of Death, Way of the Dragon, Ong Bak, Blood Sport, Spin-kicking pillows in your bedroom when you’re home alone. Suggested Alternative Move Title: “Game of Death, 2: Bruce Lee Ain’t...

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Amélie

Overview:  A doe-eyed, naive young woman finds love amidst her clever schemes at arranging happiness and justice for those around her. 2001;  Rated R; 122 Minutes. A Star:  Recalling the wonderment in expression from Giulietta Masina’s Gelsomino (La Strada) (and by currency, channeling the charm of Chaplin’s tramp who makes a sly appearance), Audrey Tautou haunts every scene with disarming presence.  Tautou is a seraph, a pixie.  With the hinge of her jaw slightly askew, her natural expression is a lightly crooked, scheming grin.  She is slight of frame but strong in posture when she walks, gliding, the way we might imagine fairies move.  Her eyes naturally wide, the whites reveal themselves as crescent moons when her gaze shifts to any direction.  But this is more than just appearances. As the narrative solicits belief in more and more unlikely occurrence, Tautou lends to Amélie the focus and balance of a hypnotist and we slowly fall under her spell. Perspective (Take One):  Amélie is a movie about perspective. Jean-Pierre Jeunet injects a strong voyeurism motif, wherein the act of watching is pivotal to every scene and character.  Within the film’s first ten minutes, we learn that Amélie loves watching movie-goers behind her in theaters (a not-so-subtle suggestion the movie knows about us, the audience) and her imagination takes us into 17 bedrooms, where multiple couples’ reach orgasms that are synchronized...

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Man on Fire

Overview:  A former assassin turned bodyguard seeks revenge for the kidnapping of the young girl who helped him find meaning in his life. 2004; Rated R; 146 minutes. The Opening Act: Casual movie-goers seem to love revenge flicks.  The subgenre is entrenched in the DNA of second rate movies.  The film industry is always ready to offer an appeasement for the vengeance fantasies that exist in our culture’s collective consciousness.  Man on Fire breaks this standard in its opening act. We know John Creasy (Denzel Washington) to be a violent man by our introduction to his backstory, but we...

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City Lights

Overview: Charlie Chaplin’s Tramp gives us his most moving and sincere adventure as he looks to win the affection of a blind flower vendor by hiding from her his low social status. 1931; 121 Minutes Vintage Chaplin:  The Tramp’s grace and dexterity punctuate his trademark slapstick physical comedy.  In scenes like the that of the boxing match, Chaplin displays the poise of a ballerina.  His waddle is poetic.  His falls are mainstage events.  In Chaplin’s ability to express through exaggerated expression, we see the infant stages of film comedy. The camera outlines for us its favorite subjects of human description—the stage ready eyes, the uncontrollably sincere mouth.  Filmed and released a few years after introduction of the talkie, Chaplin refused to include voices in his picture, insisting that the advent of sound tainted the purity of movies.  While time ultimately proved him wrong on this front, his movie suffers nothing to the viewpoint, as the orchestral score expresses as much as any dialogue or monologue could have hoped to accomplish.   The Fairest of His Ladies:  No one ever occupied the spotlight with Chaplin as successfully as Virginia Cherril.  No onscreen partner ever shared as poignant a chemistry.  As earnest as Chaplin is in his romantic comedic pursuits, Cherril proves to be an honest match in her adoration, optimism, and hope.  Chaplin was always ready to make a statement...

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American Beauty

Overview: Tired of his mundane, suburban existence, Lester Burnham becomes enamored with his daughter’s attractive friend and decides to change his life around. DreamWorks Pictures. 1999. Rated R. 122 Minutes. The Good: Kevin Spacey won an Oscar for his performance as Lester Burnham, and that performance is one of the few bright spots in this film. Burnham is going through a mid-life crisis and Spacey captures the essence of that perfectly with his despondent facial expressions and monotone voice. As Burnham’s outlook on life becomes more positive, Spacey makes the transformation seamless as an air of confidence begins to...

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Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937)

Overview: A young princess, Snow White, is driven from her home by fear of her jealous stepmother, who envies her youth and beauty.  Walt Disney Productions; 83 minutes. The Fair: This is one of those Disney movies in which the story is secondary to the beauty of the hand-drawn backgrounds and the nuanced animation. Little ones won’t know it, but they’re watching a work of art. That doesn’t mean the plot is uninteresting, however. It is simple and linear, with plenty of touches meant just for children. The dwarfs are silly and fun, and provide a bit of a...

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Casablanca

Overview: During World War II, a cynical American expatriate struggles against his own desire to help a former lover and her new husband find safety; Warner Brothers; 1942; Rated PG;  102 minutes. The Value of Sentiment: Often, when we as a film culture make our innumerous greatest-ever films list, Casablanca is a passing thought, a reluctant inclusion that we stuff ranked somewhere in the low teens out of a sense of obligation. I believe this has something to do with the film’s blatant fixation toward and application of sentimentality. The film is not only aware of its obsession with sentimentality, it openly discusses it in more than one scene. Certainly, there exists an element of plasticity in this movie, a glossy artificial surface that begs us not to dig. For evidence, look no further than Sam’s obvious piano-playing pantomime, his open palms bouncing over and over in the same place, with no regard for the complexity of the room’s music (it’s quite funny, on first notice). This shininess is a tool of focus though, guiding the reader to concentrate on the dialogue-driven and rich character drama. Think of these characters: Ilsa Lund is disarmingly beautiful but a uniquely complex heroine for the time. And her lover Victor Laszlo, our hero’s obstacle, is a good guy in the most universal sense. If that’s not a departure from early film formula…...

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Gladiator (2000)

Overview:  A Roman General has his family murdered, is left for dead, and returns to Rome as an enslaved gladiator to seek revenge and save the Empire.  DreamWorks/Universal; 2000 Rated R; 155 minutes. Ummmm…: This ain’t History class, folks.  If you grade your movies sharply against historical accuracy, I can assure you that this is not the film for you.  General historical consensus suggests that the Maximus who exists in this movie did not exist in ancient Rome.  However, that does not stop Russell Crowe from giving the character considerable screen-life.  For the purpose of cinematic celebration, it is...

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Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones

Overview:  Attack of the Clones revels in the political intrigue, but make no mistake this film is all about Anakin Skywalker and the beginning of his descent into one of the most iconic villains of all time, Darth Vader. LucasFilms; 2002; 142 Minutes. Using the Force: Perhaps the best thing about this film, and what sets it apart from its predecessor The Phantom Menace, is the great lead-ins to future events. Attack of the Clones explains the origin of the Stormtroopers.  (obvious  spoiler alert number 1: They’re clones! And they attack!). It also gives us insight into the guy that will eventually...

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The Prestige

Overview: Tragedy and a competitive desire  ignites a chain of deception between a brilliant illusionist and a captivating performer whose rivalry wavers on the edge of obsession. Touchstone Pictures/Warner Bros. Pictures. 2007. Rated PG-13. 130 Minutes. Every Magic Trick Consists of Three Parts: There is a pattern to every illusion, a guiding structure.  1) A Pledge where we are presented with the ordinary.  2) The Turn where the ordinary becomes extraordinary.  3) The Prestige where we are brought full circle.  There’s a secret here, a curiosity.  But do we really want to know or would we prefer to be fooled?  Watch closely…...

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