The Near-Brilliant Anti-Art Depravity of We Are the Flesh Jan11

The Near-Brilliant Anti-Art Depravity of We Are th...

“There is no such thing as love,” the sister (María Evioli) explains to her brother (Diego Gamalie) as she stands over his face, dripping menstrual blood onto his lips, “Only demonstrations of love.” This disturbing sequence is one of a handful in Emiliano Rocha Minter’s shocking new film in which a depraved conceit is paired with dialogue that admits the conceit’s thematic purpose. There is no sly and layered symbolism or disorienting obfuscation here. In this sense, Rocha Minter’s film is less like those of Pier Paolo Passolini, Lars von Trier, or Gaspar Noé (shock cinema royalty against whose...

5 David Bowie Songs That Should Be Movies Jan10

5 David Bowie Songs That Should Be Movies

There’s really no need for an introduction or for us to tell you how powerful David Bowie’s music is, how it stretched across generations and electrified all of our odd bits and ultimately made us feel more alive in our strangeness. We’ve spent the better part of a year celebrating his eternal greatness and re-listening to his music, a gift which has aided so many of us in our quest to put words down on the page and twist our imagination in new ways until they become reality. To celebrate David Bowie’s creativity and genius, we’ve decided to pay tribute to him through the best way we know how: a melding of our love of music and movies. Here...

A Monster Calls Succeeds by Failing as a Fairy Tale Jan10

A Monster Calls Succeeds by Failing as a Fairy Tal...

Overview: A monster helps a young boy come to terms with losing his terminally ill mother. Focus Features; 2016; Rated PG-13; 108 minutes. Messily Ever After: A Monster Calls is a garbage fairy tale. The wicked grandmother is far from wicked. The handsome young prince is sort of petulant and makes every effort to not be a hero. The midnight-visiting monster is better at telling confusing stories than doing any of the standard things that a monster would do. And the ancient magic tree does not cure a damn thing. But J.A. Bayona-directed adaptation of the fantasy novel from Patrick Ness concedes its intention to fail at being a fairy tale...

Go North: A Gorgeously Filmed Debut With Missteps Jan10

Go North: A Gorgeous...

Overview: After an unidentified disaster wipes out the adults of the world, a community of children and teenagers descends into dangerous chaos run by a rowdy crew of high school jocks. Desperate for freedom, friends Josh and Jessie run away in search of other survivors and hope for the...

Our Most Anticipated 2017 Movies Jan09

Our Most Anticipated 2017 Movies

We’re in the hangover stage. We’ve finished our “Best of 2016” lists, we are caught up on Awards Season contenders, drained by the Golden Globes ceremonies, and we’re looking directly into the dull eyes of that movie release deadzone of January and February. So, if you’re like us, you may be in need of an energy shot. If 2017 is anything like 2016, we are going to need movies to come through big with a remedy of escapism, entertainment, and sense-making. So we’ve compiled a forward-looking list of all the things that we are excited for in the upcoming year. — Split (January 20, 2017) Some...

Fences is a Performance Powerhouse With Questionable Follow-Through Jan09

Fences is a Performance Powerhouse With Questionab...

Overview: Based on August Wilson’s Pulitzer-Prize winning play, Fences examines the struggles of an aging black man in the 1950s as he tries to provide for his family, while his personal failures isolate him. Paramount Pictures; 2016; Rated PG-13; 139 minutes. August Personage: We’d be hard pressed to find a writer who so exquisitely captured the voices of black Americans during the 20th century like August Wilson. Wilson’s works carry blackness within their very punctuation, each break, stammer, or interruption illuminating a great soul of humanity, each one beautiful, damaged, and as individually complex as the laws, regulations, and...

Weekly Clickables: Taboo, Sci-Fi, & Women In ...

Our Weekly Clickables were a little harder to gather this week than usual, as it was the first week of the year, but we still found a few items worth your time. First, Flavorwire compiled their most anticipated films of 2017. Gwilym Mumford at The Guardian wrote a review of Taboo, the new series starring Tom Hardy, which will give you an idea of what to expect from the show. Nerd Much? updated their list of upcoming sci-fi movies. 2017 promises to be a good year for science fiction. At The Verge, Kaitlyn Tiffany explains her resolution to spend her money on films created by women. And if you want to join Kaitlyn Tiffany in that goal, check...

Podcasts of the Week: 01/09/17 Jan09

Podcasts of the Week...

Podcasts are awesome (especially From First to Last) and each week sees brand new, fantastic shows appearing, demanding to be fed into your ears. How do you decide what to listen to and what to ignore? Not to worry, Audiences Everywhere has you covered. Each week we’ll give our picks for the...

The Best Twitter Reactions to the 74th Golden Globes Jan08

The Best Twitter Reactions to the 74th Golden Glob...

As always, Twitter does it best… Here are the best reactions to the 2017 Golden Globes ceremony.   Good luck at the #GoldenGlobes, everybody—and by “everybody,” I mean the cast and crew of MOONLIGHT and no one else. — Sasha (@ThatSashaJames) January 9, 2017 imagine if they had a manchester by the sea-style opening and everyone was just standing in the cold, crying. #GoldenGlobes — Laura Saladino (@lesaladino) January 9, 2017 Mahershala did T H E M O S T this year so let’s shout out to his hustle #GoldenGlobes pic.twitter.com/jBAZjoSgmy — Alanna Bennett (@AlannaBennett) January 9, 2017 donald glover thanked migos...

Live Updates of the 74th Annual Golden Globes Jan08

Live Updates of the 74th Annual Golden Globes

At the Beverly Hilton in Hollywood California, Jimmy Fallon is now opening the Golden Globes ceremony with his opening musical intro and monologue and Awards Season is in full swing. Golden Globe awards are handed out for both film and television by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). The HFPA consists of roughly 90 members and has been awarding the Globes since 1943. Make sure you refresh the page, as Audiences Everywhere will have live updates of the nominations as they are announced and a recap after they are finish. If you can’t watch the broadcast, I’ll have live updates of the winners all evening, with a final tally and...

AE Monthly Book Club: January 2017

Happy New Year’s, everyone! The beginning of a year means a fresh round of book selections for us to enjoy with one another. In order to break in 2017, we’ve selected a novel that’s both challenging and rewarding. The Handmaid’s Tale is sure to get your juices flowing after the holidays. For January we will be reading Margaret Atwood’s classic work of speculative fiction, The Handmaid’s Tale. Released in 1985, the novel is set in a dystopia made from what once was the United States sometime after the government was overthrown by a totalitarian theocracy. It’s not only a book that’s been feeling kind of prescient...

Netflix Hidden Gem #91: Blue Jay

Blue Jay (2016) Director: Alex Lehmann Genre: Drama Netflix Synopsis: Past lovers meet unexpectedly in their hometown and reconnect through one meaningful night. Overview: I don’t like crying at movies just for the sake of crying. It’s just not my idea of a good time. Sometimes it feels like movies of the romance/drama genre aim to shoot little darts at the ovaries/brovaries of viewers just to get a cheap reaction rather than relying on solid writing and performances to get the message across. Quite frankly, outside of the random repeat viewing of Bridges of Madison County, I never go looking for that kind of “get me some ice cream”...

Netflix Hidden Gem #90: The Wailing

The Wailing (2016) Director: Na Hong-jin Genre: Horror 20th Century Fox Synopsis: A mysterious, violent illness descends on a village and impacts a family, testing their spiritual limits. Overview: Korean horror has been sitting deservedly high on its throne for decades. Fans who appreciate its elegant style eagerly anticipate each new release or return to the classics with admiration for the genre that’s well-earned. Creeping through the festival circuit this year was The Wailing, an epic story of the lengths a father will go to save the life of his daughter, and how destructive our fear of “the other” can be. One word that always...