Netflix Hidden Gem #97: 3 Women

3 Women (1977) Director: Robert Altman Genre: Drama 20th Century Fox Synopsis: In a barren 1970s California desert town, a woman forms a complicated relationship with her mysterious co-worker at an elderly rehabilitation center. Overview: Among the deluge of outrageous and depressing headlines that came out of November 2016, Shelley Duvall’s appearance on Dr. Phil stood out. Duvall’s obvious mental illness became fodder for the kind of tabloid opportunism that turns human lives and stories into an “eyes at any cost” media strategy. There was of course a collective response of disapproval, but our attentions have been diverted to the newer,...

Amy Schumer and Goldie Hawn Get Snatched in First Trailer Feb07

Amy Schumer and Goldie Hawn Get Snatched in First ...

Here’s our first look at Amy Schumer’s continuing rise to movie stardom in Jonathan Levine’s (50/50, The Night Before) Snatched. Official Synopsis: After her boyfriend dumps her on the eve of their exotic vacation, impetuous dreamer Emily Middleton (Amy Schumer) persuades her ultra-cautious mother, Linda (Goldie Hawn) to travel with her to paradise. Polar opposites, Emily and Linda realize that working through their differences as mother and daughter – in unpredictable, hilarious fashion – is the only way to escape the wildly outrageous jungle adventure they have fallen into. I think by now everyone has an...

Comic-to-Film Primer: Iron Fist (Updated with Offi...

Marvel’s partnership with Netflix has created a nice little block within the Marvel Cinematic Universe, one where the heroes are a bit more tormented, the villains are far more complicated, and everyone’s developed a bit of an outsider complex in the face of urban decay. The final corner of this block is easily the strangest of them all, an outsider even among a group of outsiders like Daredevil, Jessica Jones, and Luke Cage. He is Danny Rand, the Iron Fist. Doctor Strange introduced us to a world of mystic arts within the MCU, and Iron Fist will take us even further as we witness Danny Rand channel mystical kung fu powers and earn his...

Remembering Sir John Hurt, Sci-Fi Royalty Feb07

Remembering Sir John Hurt, Sci-Fi Royalty

Sir John Hurt will always be acting royalty. He sits in that pantheon of British actors who could be in any movie and just class the place up no matter the quality of the material. The acting world is a less classy place with him gone, but specifically the sci-fi genre will feel the loss the most. It wasn’t until he died that I realised how pivotal and important Hurt had been for science fiction movies. I knew about Alien and obviously that he was in Doctor Who, but after he died and I started looking at his filmography I saw the extent at which he was involved in science fiction over his six decade spanning career, and how...

T2 Trainspotting Comes Close To Greatness Feb07

T2 Trainspotting Comes Close To Greatness

Overview: Twenty years after abandoning his friends, Mark (Ewan McGregor) returns home to Edinburgh to make amends. Meanwhile, Simon (Jonny Lee Miller) and Begbie (Robert Carlyle) plot their revenge on him for the money he stole. TriStar Pictures; 2017; Rated R; 117 minutes. Choose Your Future: The question of how to make a great sequel, especially over two decades later, is one that is often asked but rarely answered satisfactorily. With legacy sequels, you have a wide range of uses of nostalgia. There’s Harrison Ford’s, “Chewie, we’re home,” that made people cry simply watching a trailer for Star Wars: The Force Awakens, and on the other...

AE Monthly Book Club: February 2017

Well, we survived January without the world being nuked into the sun so it’s time to see what’s on the agenda for February’s book club choice. For this month we will be mixing it up a bit and reading a graphic novel. Prince of Cats is a retelling of Romeo & Juliet from the point of view of Tybalt, Juliet’s cousin and the titular prince of cats. The action starts before the play and we get to see what happened in Tybalt’s life to make him the angry and violent young man of the original play. Also, the whole book is set in 1983 Brooklyn, mostly written in iambic pentameter, infused with ’80s hip hop...

Still Looking Out For Us: Shyamalan’s Split & Mental Illness Feb06

Still Looking Out For Us: Shyamalan’s Split ...

I knew what we were in for the moment I saw the first trailer for M. Night Shyamalan’s new film Split. Critics have long had it out for Shyamalan. Before the release of The Visit in 2015, I wrote about how the cultural consensus has consistently and willfully misunderstood him as an auteur. The Visit ended up opening to the sort of widespread acclaim that had evaded his work for over a decade. But when I saw Split’s trailer, I was sure it was about to come crashing down again, buckling under the weight of (perhaps not unfair) thinkpieces about the stigmatization of mental illness. In Split, James McAvoy plays a man named Kevin with...

Podcasts of the Week: Talk Easy & Hidden Brain Feb06

Podcasts of the Week...

Podcasts are awesome (especially From First to Last) and each week sees brand new, fantastic shows appearing, demanding to be fed into your ears. How do you decide what to listen to and what to ignore? Not to worry, Audiences Everywhere has you covered. Each week we’ll give our picks for the...

Weekly Clickables: James Baldwin & Films About American Immigration Feb06

Weekly Clickables: James Baldwin & Films Abou...

In this week’s Weekly Clickables, we have a review, a few lists, and some fan art. Plenty to soothe your post-Super Bowl blues (or to entertain you in a regular way). First, a review of the new James Baldwin documentary I Am Not Your Negro, which by almost all accounts is life-changing, and which I was supposed to see and review on Friday until they canceled all showings at the theater near me. Not that I’m bitter or upset in any way. This review at least gives a taste of what seeing the film might actually be like, courtesy of The Guardian. Next, the The AV Club provides a list of films capturing the experience of immigrating...

Rings Is Terrifyingly Boring Feb06

Rings Is Terrifyingly Boring

Overview: When her boyfriend goes missing at college, a young woman finds out he’s discovered a cursed video tape that kills everyone who views it. Paramount Pictures; 2017; Rated PG-13; 102 minutes. Before the Franchise Dies: It doesn’t matter if you have seen The Ring, Gore Verbinski’s 2002 masterpiece American remake of the Japanese classic, or the forgotten 2005 sequel The Ring Two. Rings, the third installment in the series, tells you everything you need to know to keep up really quickly. In its first cold opening (and there are multiple ones), in which a passenger on a plane meets his fabled seventh-day fate in a...

Super Bowl 51 TV Spot Roundup Feb05

Super Bowl 51 TV Spot Roundup

We’re going to be live-updating the TV spots from tonight’s Super Bowl LI! A few studios have already jumped the gun (we’ll call it pre-gaming) but the rest should steadily roll-out during the game. So relax movie fans; get up, stretch, and walk around during the commerical breaks. We’ve got you covered! Baywatch A Cure For Wellness The Fate of the Furious Logan Pirates of the Carribean: Dead Men Tell No Tales Guaridans of the Galaxy Vol. 2 Transformers: The Last Knight Life John Wick Chapter 2 Ghost in the Shell TV The Handmaid’s Tale Stranger Things Featured Image: Paramount Pictures Richard NewbyRichard is a...

Chapter & Verse Is Indulgent Viewing Feb03

Chapter & Verse...

Overview: A recently paroled ex-gang member struggles to re-acclimate himself into society after serving eight years in prison. Paladin; 2015; Not Rated; 97 minutes. Tough Crowd, Tough Crowd…: One of the film critics I find myself returning to over and over again for inspiration is the...

Stay Calm: 500 Movies That Soothe Real World Anxiety Feb02

Stay Calm: 500 Movies That Soothe Real World Anxie...

It’s been a tough two weeks. We here at AE sort of lean on each other like family and, needless to say, we have had to do a bit more leaning than usual as of late. Anxiety is, for us and many others, at an all-time high. Recently, we started discussing what movies we watch in moments of great stress to help comfort ourselves. Out of curiosity, I opened that line of discussion to our Twitter audience. The response was pretty overwhelming. When compiling everyone’s answer into a list, it seems, with a few lax interpretations and maybe some flawed math, we received over 500 answers. I’ve pooled them together below. But...