The Original Star Wars Trilogy & Its Hopeful Hero Mar23

The Original Star Wa...

Throughout the month of March, Audiences Everywhere will be sharing appreciation for film trilogies, including personal reflections from our writers on some of their favorites. Today, we’re discussing a singular hero’s role in perhaps the quintessential movie trilogy: Star Wars‘...

It Could Be All Of Us: Unearthing John Carpenter’s Apocalypse Trilogy Mar21

It Could Be All Of Us: Unearthing John Carpenter’s...

Throughout the month of March, Audiences Everywhere will be sharing appreciation for film trilogies, including personal reflections from our writers on some of their favorites. Today, we’re discussing the thematic link between three of John Carpenter’s masterworks. There’s a great big hole in the world. At its center resides the agent of our undoing. So we bury it. We build foundations over it, foundations built on the unknowable things we think we know. And while that agent of undoing may be covered, that hole is not filled. Relationships, religion, and entertainment form a holy trinity of forgetting, of distraction . . . that is...

Humanity and Iconicity in the Captain America Trilogy Mar16

Humanity and Iconicity in the Captain America Tril...

Throughout the month of March, Audiences Everywhere will be sharing appreciation for film trilogies, including personal reflections from our writers on some of their favorites. Today, we’re discussing the recent Captain America trilogy. Iconicity is the relationship of similarity between the two sides of a symbol—its form and its meaning. The closer the form and meaning are to one another, the more memorable the symbol is likely to be. An iconic symbol is one whose form resembles its meaning in some way; the opposite of this iconicity is arbitrariness. The red and white stripes, star, and ‘A’ of Captain America’s costume...

Roman Polanski’s Apartment Trilogy & The Claustrophobic Architecture Of Self Mar14

Roman Polanski’s Apartment Trilogy & Th...

Throughout the month of March, Audiences Everywhere will be sharing appreciation for film trilogies, including personal reflections from our writers on some of their favorites. Today, we’re discussing Roman Polanski’s Apartment Trilogy. As a raw medium for displaying our psyches, horror is pushed by trends that first pull from the sociopolitical climate of their inception and ride that wave until it’s no longer lucrative or immediately applicable. Because of this, horror subgenres have always enjoyed a natural ebb and flow. “Apartment horror” was a powerful–and then overused–subgenre of the ’60s and ’70s in such films as...

Back to the Future: Movie Making and Mythologising Mar09

Back to the Future: Movie Making and Mythologising

Throughout the month of March, Audiences Everywhere will be sharing appreciation for film trilogies, including personal reflections from our writers on some of their favorites. Today, we’re discussing Back to the Future. Back to the Future – Movie Making and Mythologising The Back to the Future trilogy is about a lot of things: fate, destiny, love, bravery, toxic masculinity, rock and roll, the past, present, and future. It is heavy on both action and comedy and features some great sci-fi and romance, too. And today it almost feels like a relic of a time when a summer blockbuster could just be unashamedly fun. The trilogy is...

Bette vs. Joan: What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? Mar09

Bette vs. Joan: What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?

Bette Davis and Joan Crawford. Both names bring to mind the soft black-and-white era of the ‘30s, glamour, fame, and romance. Two women who were stubborn and inspired and incredibly gifted. Two icons that are almost always mentioned in the same breath due to their tumultuous enmity. Legend has it that their epic feud began over a man, Franchot Tone. Tone played Bette’s lead opposite in Dangerous, the first film for which she received an Oscar. Both she and Joan are rumoured to have loved him, but when Joan nailed him down in marriage, it was at a time when Bette’s career was waning and Joan’s beginning to wax. As if heartbreak wasn’t...

T2 Trainspotting: A Nostalgic Movie about Nostalgia Mar08

T2 Trainspotting: A Nostalgic Movie about Nostalgi...

For good or ill, nostalgia has taken over cinema. We have reached a point with cinema and TV where anything has the possibility of returning. Gone are the days of a show being canceled with no hope of coming back, and here to stay is the age of not letting go. A few years ago, Arrested Development, a show long since assumed  gone forever, returned to our screens. In just a few months we will have more Twin Peaks, when just a few years ago, the chances would have seemed slim at best. By December we’ll have had the third new Star Wars movie in as many years as well as a new Star Trek series, a Charmed reboot, a Baywatch movie, a CHiPs movie,...

Be (Reluctantly) the Change You Wish to See in the World: A Cornetto Trilogy Appreciation Mar07

Be (Reluctantly) the Change You Wish to See in the...

Throughout the month of March, Audiences Everywhere will be sharing appreciation for film trilogies, including personal reflections from our writers on some of their favorites. This week, we’re starting with The Cornetto Trilogy. “Be (Reluctantly) the Change You Wish to See in the World: A Cornetto Trilogy Appreciation” Shortly before the release of Rogue One, amid all the media hoopla and internet chatter, something compelled my older sister to call me. Not a rare occurrence, but not a regular one either. She was calling, she explained, because she wanted me to know that I’d been there for the original, in ‘77. I hadn’t...

The Humanity We Lost With Bill Paxton Mar02

The Humanity We Lost With Bill Paxton

After his passing on February 25, 2017, it quickly became clear, perhaps a little too late, that Bill Paxton will be talked about about as one of the great human actors. A man filled to the brim with realness, who looked natural in any part and yet never quite looked like a movie star. Instead, Paxton often looked like some dude from down the street having the time of his life, who just happened to be on a movie set while they were shooting. At other times, Paxton infused characters with a level of dignity and humanity they probably didn’t deserve and wouldn’t have received if played by another actor. Many times, the characters...

Get Out: I Am The White Monster Feb27

Get Out: I Am The White Monster

It matters that Dean Armitage (Bradley Whitford) tells Chris Washington (Daniel Kaluuya) that he would have voted for Obama for a third term. Yeah, it’s also a funny bit of dialogue, throwing back to an earlier scene in which Rose (Allison Williams), Dean’s daughter and Chris’s girlfriend, warned Chris that he would end up having this conversation with her totally-not-racist father. Obviously, it’s an awkward exchange. That’s where the joke comes from. But Jordan Peele, the former MADtv and Key & Peele writer and star making his directorial debut with Get Out, has crafted a film of easy superficial delight but one that also...

Happy Birthday, Paul Lieberstein, AKA “Toby”! Feb22

Happy Birthday, Paul Lieberstein, AKA “Toby”!

While the American version of The Office was filled with lovable oddballs (as was the British one, I’m sure, but I can’t with Gervais), for some reason, it was always Paul Lieberstein’s Toby that resonated with me. Toby radiated awkward sincerity in every interaction with his co-workers and the earnestness with which he approached his thankless job—which admittedly he was not terrific at, but look what he was working with—was laudable. His performance is endearing without being treacly, and somehow sad sack despite the likelihood he’s probably one of the most high-functioning people at the Scranton branch of Dunder-Mifflin. So today we’re...

Technical Proficiency & Emotional Agency In John Wick Feb16

Technical Proficiency & Emotional Agency In J...

I reviewed John Wick back when it was released in 2014 and gave it a positive review. Several years on, my love has only grown for the genre-specific action flick. I’d go as far as calling John Wick a near perfect movie. Among the many elements executed as precisely and efficiently as John Wick executes headshots, John Wick is peppered with world building better implemented than most major franchises. It’s added flavor, both unique and essential to the stylings of this underworld of assassins. Visually while not only appealing with uses of color and production design, the world of Wick is coordinated with a thorough code. While the...

How I Met Your Mother: The Imperfect Love Story Feb14

How I Met Your Mother: The Imperfect Love Story

It’s been about three years since showrunners Craig Thomas and Carter Bays treated viewers to the finale of their nearly decade-long sitcom, How I Met Your Mother. The series, which focuses on Ted Mosby (Josh Radnor) recounting to his children the many events that led up to his first encounter with their mother, grew in popularity as Ted’s fictional journey to meet “the One” grew ever more lonely and desperate. The following the series brought in could be attributed to audiences’ attachment to Ted’s story (possibly due to the similar popularity of heartwarming rom-coms of the 2000s), or to the series’ biggest star, Barney Stinson (Neil...

Evolving Evils & Identities In Resident Evil Feb09

Evolving Evils & Identities In Resident Evil

Back in 2002, post-Matrix black leather and slo-mo aesthetics were the defining traits of the next wannabe blockbusters. One of these, Resident Evil was a relatively tame video game adaptation, borrowing ideas more so than plot (something that has never been a strong suit for the series in any iteration): A group of soldiers enter a facility run by the Umbrella corporation called The Hive. It’s a simple premise that grows in scale with each entry, propelling itself through ever-evolving scenarios. Marco Beltrami and Marilyn Manson’s score influences the techno-horror vibe writer Paul W.S. Anderson is going for. Resident Evil is a...

Remembering Sir John Hurt, Sci-Fi Royalty Feb07

Remembering Sir John Hurt, Sci-Fi Royalty

Sir John Hurt will always be acting royalty. He sits in that pantheon of British actors who could be in any movie and just class the place up no matter the quality of the material. The acting world is a less classy place with him gone, but specifically the sci-fi genre will feel the loss the most. It wasn’t until he died that I realised how pivotal and important Hurt had been for science fiction movies. I knew about Alien and obviously that he was in Doctor Who, but after he died and I started looking at his filmography I saw the extent at which he was involved in science fiction over his six decade spanning career, and how...

Still Looking Out For Us: Shyamalan’s Split & Mental Illness Feb06

Still Looking Out For Us: Shyamalan’s Split ...

I knew what we were in for the moment I saw the first trailer for M. Night Shyamalan’s new film Split. Critics have long had it out for Shyamalan. Before the release of The Visit in 2015, I wrote about how the cultural consensus has consistently and willfully misunderstood him as an auteur. The Visit ended up opening to the sort of widespread acclaim that had evaded his work for over a decade. But when I saw Split’s trailer, I was sure it was about to come crashing down again, buckling under the weight of (perhaps not unfair) thinkpieces about the stigmatization of mental illness. In Split, James McAvoy plays a man named Kevin with...

10 Times Dave Chappelle Was Right About Everything Feb01

10 Times Dave Chappelle Was Right About Everything

When Dave Chappelle walked away from Chappelle’s Show after just three seasons, leaving a fifty million dollar deal on the table, he created a narrative. Prior to his abrupt two-week getaway to South Africa, Chappelle was more than just the man of the moment, his show was more than just the most popular on Comedy Central, arguably the most popular of all time and inarguably its most important. Chappelle was the mediator of an unprecedented cultural conversation about race, inequality, and deeply-sown institutional injustice. Every week, Chappelle and his troupe managed to sit an interracial audience in numbers that were outstanding...

10 Directors We Would Love To See Take Over The Batman Jan31

10 Directors We Would Love To See Take Over The Ba...

With yesterday’s unfortunate news that Ben Affleck will no longer sit in the director’s chair for The Batman, the search is on for a new filmmaker to take over WB’s biggest property. While the loss of Affleck is a definite disappointment, there are far too many talented directors out there for fans to fall into the trap of doom and gloom for the still novel DCEU. The trick will be finding a director who can bring a distinguishable style and visual flair to the film, while still working within the interlocked set-up of a cinematic universe. Directors David Fincher and Darren Aronofksy have been names that fans have tossed around for nearly...

A Series of Unfortunate Events is a Very Funny Drama Jan31

A Series of Unfortunate Events is a Very Funny Dra...

It’s not often that you get a second chance to see something you love adapted for the screen. Usually you get one shot, and if it’s bad then that’s it. You’re left with a novel or series of novels you love and a movie you dislike. Unless, that is, the source material you like is Spider-Man comics, in which case it seems as though you get unlimited attempts. With A Series of Unfortunate Events, it seemed as though the 2004 movie was the only filmed version we would get of Daniel Handler/Lemony Snicket’s fantastic series of books. There are things to like about the movie. The cast is great and it looks correct but there are changes and tweaks...

Watching Barry In Trump’s America Jan11

Watching Barry In Trump’s America

In director Vikram Gandhi’s new film Barry, American citizens who have been waking up in fear every morning are offered the hope of a communal solution. Some context that you already know: A man with no prior political experience has been elected to become the Leader of the Free World, despite losing the popular vote. Donald J. Trump, a notorious philanderer, real estate developer, and reality television star, will unseat current president Barack Obama in fewer than two weeks. After eight years of social progress and liberal civility, the very worst monsters have emerged from the closet of American history. Bigotry, sexism, and racism have...

The Near-Brilliant Anti-Art Depravity of We Are the Flesh Jan11

The Near-Brilliant Anti-Art Depravity of We Are th...

“There is no such thing as love,” the sister (María Evioli) explains to her brother (Diego Gamalie) as she stands over his face, dripping menstrual blood onto his lips, “Only demonstrations of love.” This disturbing sequence is one of a handful in Emiliano Rocha Minter’s shocking new film in which a depraved conceit is paired with dialogue that admits the conceit’s thematic purpose. There is no sly and layered symbolism or disorienting obfuscation here. In this sense, Rocha Minter’s film is less like those of Pier Paolo Passolini, Lars von Trier, or Gaspar Noé (shock cinema royalty against whose...

Who Is You: Moonlight, Hell or High Water, and America’s Identity Crisis Jan03

Who Is You: Moonlight, Hell or High Water, and Ame...

The two best dick measuring contests in 2016 film, one figurative and one literal, occur in movies that are almost diametrically opposed in genre aesthetic. In the center of David Mackenzie’s neo-Western Hell or High Water, outlaw Tanner Howard (Ben Foster) takes a break from righteous bank robbing to indulge in casino poker, and, because he feels he must, he verbally provokes the meanest mug at the table. His opponent in the hand is a muscular Comanche. “Lords of the plain,” Tanner says. “Lords of nothing now,” the Native American corrects him. Neither gambler folds. They play out to the river card, as men do, and then stand to bump uneven...

2016’s Movie Report Card: Grading the Year in Film Dec31

2016’s Movie R...

Commencement Address The practical thing to do here, I guess, for the sake of building a brand, would be to start this post the same way I started last year’s. That is, I should start by saying, “We survived 2016.” But last year, that simple statement felt like an empty...

2016: The Year in Women Dec30

2016: The Year in Women

2016 has been—well, not our favorite year for intense reflection. But as the year comes to a close, we at Audiences Everywhere want to celebrate the women who made 2016 one worth remembering fondly. From the brilliant writers and directors to the incredible actresses and comediennes to the beloved fictional characters, this year was lucky enough to see the most talented women in the industry creating some of this year’s best content. The Multi-Hyphenate: Kelly Fremon Craig – Edge of Seventeen Kelly Fremon Craig had earned writer’s credits before—with 2008’s Streak and 2009’s Post Grad—but 2016 provided our first glimpse at her multi-tasking...

The 20 Best Movies of 2016 Chosen by Audiences Everywhere Dec29

The 20 Best Movies of 2016 Chosen by Audiences Eve...

It’s that time of year: those last few calendar days where our team risks complete dissolution to select and rank the best films from the past 365 days. We have fought, bartered, and bargained our way through a passionate cycle of disagreement and forgiveness, calculated quality with an equation so complex that it might be the subject of the Hidden Figures sequel, and, finally, we are ready to present to you our selections for the twenty best movies of 2016. … 20. Hail, Caesar! Hail Caesar! has a plot that makes you want to watch the movie even before you know its by the Coen brothers. A big time Old Hollywood star is kidnapped...