Tag: Features

Hitchcock the… Feminist? A Look Back at Suspicion

Preconceived notions abound when it comes to the work of Alfred Hitchcock. Even in his prime, most viewers would walk in expecting certain things; a murder, a beautiful blonde of varying trustworthiness, and some bit of psychology (even if it was pop psychology at best). Certainly those themes reveal themselves in much of his work, but I think that sells him short. Among other attributes, he was a master of changing tone—both within a film and between films—as well as playing with genre conventions, some of which he fostered or created. The cleverness of Hitchcock is that he is...

Read More

Rope’s Disguised Cuts and Hitchcock’s Undying Influence on Editing

Whenever one watches Alfred Hitchcock’s masterpiece Rope, the first element of filmmaking that comes to mind is the setting: we, along with the characters, spend the entirety of the film in one location. Rope wasn’t the first film to exist solely in one location but it certainly remains as the most fascinating. It’s like watching an episode of Murder She Wrote or reading an Agatha Christie novel, except our ‘detective’ is merely a teacher and our criminals are already identified by the third frame of the film. Rope is often lumped in with other films in the mystery genre,...

Read More

A Ghost Story and The Weight of Time

Earlier this year, I read Richard McGuire’s graphic novel Here. It’s a book entirely composed of drawings of a particular space, depicted from the beginning of time to far in the future. One page will show a man in 2005 taking care of his father in his living room, for example, and the next page will show a Native American shooting an arrow, hundreds of years in the past, but in the same spot. One page shows a holographic woman in 2213 teaching a group of tourists about the technology people used centuries ago, and another shows the Earth...

Read More

A Ghost Story and The Importance of Seeking Closure

David Lowery’s latest film, A Ghost Story, is out now in theaters and I cannot urge you enough to go see if you haven’t already. It is one of the most unique films I’ve ever seen to feature ghosts and envision what it might be like on the other side of death. At least emotionally, I imagine that we don’t wear bed sheets with scissor cut holes for eyes as we wonder about finding our place in the afterlife. It sounds silly on the surface, and I’d like be lying if I said I didn’t chuckle at it initially...

Read More

Short Term 12: The Importance of Openness

In the banter-heavy cold open of 2012’s Short Term 12, Brie Larson’s Grace puts a disclaimer on the humorous anecdote her boyfriend and co-worker is about to engage in so newcomer Nate (Rami Malek) can keep his expectations in check. As Mason (John Gallagher Jr.) presumably embellishes a tall tale about tacos destroying his bowels at a bus stop, first time viewers might not realize they’re watching a drama about a troubled youth facility. But before he can finish the story, a young boy named Sammy runs screaming from the titular youth center toward the street. Grace and her colleagues...

Read More