Tag: review

Annabelle: Creation is Engaging and Spooky

Overview: 12 years after the loss of their child, a couple turn their haunted farmhouse into an orphanage. 2017; Warner Bros.; Rated R; 109 minutes The Switch: Is it too early to coin the term “Flanaganed”? Last year, Ouija: Origin of Evil won our hearts as the Most Improved Horror Franchise thanks to a surprisingly strong followup to its dead on arrival predecessor, Ouija. This was largely due to director Mike Flanagan, who took the dismal story and, by creating a prequel, salvaged the ideas that were muddled and lost in the first. It may seem unfair to bring...

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All the Queen’s Horses: A Huge Crime You Never Heard About

Overview: A city comptroller in small town Illinois perpetrated the largest case of municipal fraud—some $53 million; Kartemquin Films; 2017; NR; 71 minutes. Small Town: Dixon, Illinois (pop. 15,135) is quintessential small-town America. The town sits a bit more than an hour and a half west of Chicago and used to be most well-known as the boyhood home of Ronald Reagan (know those pictures of a young Reagan lifeguarding? That’s Dixon). At least until 2011, when a city employee noticed a strange discrepancy in some bank paperwork and stumbled headlong onto a co-worker’s $53 million secret. For more than 20...

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MIFF 2017: The Venerable W. is a Grim Cautionary Tale

Over the next few weeks, our writer in Melbourne, Sean W. Fallon, will be covering the Melbourne International Film Festival (MIFF) and reviewing some of his favourite movies from the festival. Overview: A look at the conflicts between Buddhists and Muslims in Burma and the monk who has become the face of inciting racial hatred. Les Films du Losange, 2017; Rated-R; 107 mins. Hatred: The hate speech used by Ashin Wirathu (the titular W.) is incendiary, dangerous, and hard to hear. It is also talk that is so commonplace in modern society that I found myself seeing exact phrases and expressions that...

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Person to Person is Nothing But Ordinary

Overview: A group of New Yorkers deal with life and love over the course of a nondescript day. Magnolia Pictures; 2017; Not Yet Rated; 84 minutes. Stately, Plump: It’s not an inherently bad idea to center a work of art on the quotidian struggles of ordinary people as they live their lives through a single day. James Joyce based his novel Ulysses—one of the supreme literary achievements of the modern era—on two humdrum Dubliners navigating an equally humdrum day. Dustin Guy Defa attempted something similar with his sophomore feature Person to Person, a film following a handful of tangentially...

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To The Bone Is An Imperfect But Affecting Look At Eating Disorders

Overview: A young woman works at managing her anorexia nervosa in an unconventional group home. Netflix; 2017; Rated TV-MA; 107 minutes. Body Horror: Elements of To the Bone were like watching body horror: watching Keanu Reeves’s character examine Lily Collins’s bony, bruised spine made my skin crawl. Collins, who has battled with eating disorders in the past, lost a considerable amount of weight for her role as Ellen, and its efficacy was not lost on me. Ellen is so thin that it looks physically painful, a feature that’s emphasized by her yelps of pain as she obsessively does sit-ups to...

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